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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 9 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. You can also browse the collection for Burns or search for Burns in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

reat railroad raid. 89. Obstructing the train. 90. Mrs. Bickerdyke and the Unfaithful surgeon. 91. Mrs. Bickerdyke Uses her dresses for the Union soldiers. 92. Union soldiers pursued by bloodhounds. 93. the first Tennessee cavalry Escorting rebel prisoners. 94. the leap for life. 95. the Price of loyalty in East Tennessee. 96. Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. 97. the scout and the Bloodhound. 98. Old Bradley and his daughter. 99. Bringing home the cows. 100. old Burns, the hero of Gettysburg. 101. the rescue. 102. the country must be saved if it takes every Chicken in the Confederacy. 103. I'll give you so much for them 'ere sick fellows in the hospital. narratives of spies, scouts, and detectives. Moore and Blue, the Kansas Scouts ............................. 11 A Nameless Spy ..................................... ......... 26 Corporal Pike, Scout and Ranger . ....... .............. .......... 34 A Female Scout and Spy ...........................
reat railroad raid. 89. Obstructing the train. 90. Mrs. Bickerdyke and the Unfaithful surgeon. 91. Mrs. Bickerdyke Uses her dresses for the Union soldiers. 92. Union soldiers pursued by bloodhounds. 93. the first Tennessee cavalry Escorting rebel prisoners. 94. the leap for life. 95. the Price of loyalty in East Tennessee. 96. Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. 97. the scout and the Bloodhound. 98. Old Bradley and his daughter. 99. Bringing home the cows. 100. old Burns, the hero of Gettysburg. 101. the rescue. 102. the country must be saved if it takes every Chicken in the Confederacy. 103. I'll give you so much for them 'ere sick fellows in the hospital. narratives of spies, scouts, and detectives. Moore and Blue, the Kansas Scouts ............................. 11 A Nameless Spy ..................................... ......... 26 Corporal Pike, Scout and Ranger . ....... .............. .......... 34 A Female Scout and Spy ...........................
Old Burns, the hero of Gettysburg. In the town of Gettysburg lives an old couple by the name of Burns. The old man was in the war of 1812, and is now nearly seventy years of age, yet the frosts of many winter have not chilled his patriotism or diminished his love for the old flag under which he fought in his early days. When the rebels invaded the beautiful Cumberland valley, and were marching on Gettysburg, Old Burns concluded that it was time for every loyal man, young or old, to be uon the lookout until he saw the stars and stripes coming in, carried by our brave boys. This was more than he could stand; his patriotism got the better of his age and infirmity, seizing his musket, he started out, the old lady called after him: Burns, where are you going? Oh! was the reply, I am going out to see what is going on. He immediately went to a Wisconsin regiment and asked if they would take him in. They told him they would, and gave him three rousing cheers. The old musket was