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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for Robert Burns or search for Robert Burns in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 1: Longfellow as a classic (search)
slight reaction, perhaps in the interest of supposed justice, when people try to convince themselves that his fame has already diminished. Such reactions have notably occurred, for instance, in the cases of Scott, Byron, Wordsworth, and even of Burns, yet without visible or permanent results, while the weaker fame of Southey or of Campbell has yielded to them. It is safe to say that up to the present moment no serious visible reaction has occurred in the case of Longfellow. So absolutely siNimmo at Edinburgh, containing fifty-six poems in all, each with a full-page illustration, generally by Scottish artists. Of these selections, six are taken from Longfellow, five each from Wordsworth and Thomson, and three each from Shakespeare, Burns, and Moore. Of other American poets Bryant and Willis alone appear, each with one contribution. Another such book is Words from the Poets; selected for the use of parochial schools and libraries. To this the leading contributors are Wordswort
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 6: marriage and life at Brunswick (search)
early Mary S. Potter to the later Mary S. P. Longfellow. They show many marked passages and here and there a quotation. The collection begins with Miss Edgeworth's Harry and Lucy; then follow somewhat abruptly Sabbath Recreations, by Miss Emily Taylor, and The Wreath, a selection of elegant poems from the best authors, —these poems including the classics of that day, Beattie's Minstrel, Blair's Grave, Gray's Elegy, Goldsmith's Traveller, and some lighter measures from Campbell, Moore, and Burns. The sombre muse undoubtedly predominated, but on the whole the book was not so bad an elementary preparation for the training of a poet's wife. It is a touching accidental coincidence that one of the poems most emphatically marked is one of the few American poems in these volumes, Bryant's Death of the Flowers, especially the last verse, which describes a woman who died in her youthful beauty. To these are added books of maturer counsel, as Miss Bowdler's Poems and Essays, then reprinted
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 16: literary life in Cambridge (search)
, a play never quite dramatic enough to be put on the stage, at least in English, though a German version was performed at the Ducal Court Theatre in Dessau, January 28, 1855. As literary work it was certainly well done; though taken in part from the tale of Cervantes La Gitanilla, and handled before by Montalvan and by Solis in Spanish, and by Middleton in English, it yet was essentially Longfellow's own in treatment, though perhaps rather marred by taking inappropriately the motto from Robert Burns. He wrote of it to Samuel Ward in New York, December, 1840, calling it something still longer which as yet no eye but mine has seen and which I wish to read to you first. He then adds, At present, my dear friend, my soul is wrapped up in poetry. The scales fell from my eyes suddenly, and I beheld before me a beautiful landscape, with figures, which I have transferred to paper almost without an effort, and with a celerity of which I did not think myself capable. Since my return from P
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
les Brockden, 132, 143. Brown, John, 271. Browning, Robert, 3, 6, 216, 218, 267; compared with Longfellow, 270; Longfellow a student of, 272, 273. Brownson, Orestes A., 125. Bruges, 161. Brunswick, Me., 18, 64, 69, 82, 100, 163. Bryant, William C., 8, 23, 60, 62, 64, 80, 112, 142, 265, 294; his early poems compared with Longfellow's, 24-26; moralizing of, 133, 134; indifferent to Longfellow, 145; his Selections from the American Poets, mentioned, 145. Bull, Ole, 214, 215. Burns, Robert, 7, 8, 62, 188. Bushnell, Rev., Horace, his letter to Longfellow about the Divine Tragedy, 245, 246. Byron, Lord, 7, 9, 80, 280. Cadenabbia, 223. Cadmus (ship), 46. Cambridge, Mass., 38, 40-42, 57, 75,82, 84, 116-118, 121, 139, 154, 160,169,172,179,181,182,187,192,203,205, 214, 215, 244, 272, 283, 289; Longfellow's address to the children of, 55; establishes himself in, 133; Longfellow's speech at the anniversary of, 290, 291; schools of, celebrate Longfellow's seventy-fifth b