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sciplined and uniformed militia regents were to-morrow to offer themselves for three months service, we feel confident that all would be promptly accepted. Burnside's Opinion A dispatch from Washington date Friday, June 13, says: Gen. Burnside Was in town yesterday returning to Fort Monroe, by the afternoon boat. Gen. Burnside Was in town yesterday returning to Fort Monroe, by the afternoon boat. His reports from the Peninsula, where he spent several hours with Gen, McClellan, are favorable, He sees no reason why, with good weather, our army should not be in Richmond within a very few days. He does not think that the rebels are strengthened by their-forced levies, but believes that undisciplined members endanger an army which they apparently reinforce, as was the case at Newbern, when the few North Carolina militia threw the whole rebel forces into a panic. Gen Burnside sees some signs of loyalty in the old North State, but is not so sanguine of its early return to the Union, voluntarily as are some of the newspapers correspondents. Chur
ssiles, thinning the ranks of the rebels to an astonishing extent, while our own loss was slight. About dark, Gen. Kearney finding that, notwithstanding their loss, the rebels were determined to stand their ground, ordered another bayonet charge, and so effective was the order, that they retreated over a quarter of a mile. At this juncture, when our arms seemed crowned with success, reinforcements which were evidently in reserve came up, while our own men were joined by a portion of Gen Burnside's command and General Robinson's brigade. The engagement became general, and at last a portion of General Birney's brigade, that officer being with his command, and led by the gallant Kearney, made another of their brilliant charges, and with the same result as the others.--The keen eye of Kearney at this time discovered an important point which was not properly covered, and while riding towards the spot, at his own request, and, as was always his custom when upon dangerous missions, una
in a great battle at Poolesville, and driven back in confusion to Washington. This had scarcely got well afloat before another was started to the effect that Gen. Burnside had been driven back from Frederick with great slaughter. Whilst these reports were being digested, a messenger from a point eight miles out on the Liberty roived with the announcement that General McClellan was pushing forward, and could find no enemy in front of him. A rumor was also soon afterwards started that General Burnside's pickets were yesterday morning within sight of Frederick, and the enemy traveling westward. Rebel Robbery of Frederick. The Harrisburg Telegraph, worthless. We do not hear of more than a rebel cavalry picket on the Baltimore road, near New Market, on the turnpike, and Monrovia, on the railroad. Gen Burnside was said yesterday to be threatening the enemy's lines near Hyattville, which would indicate that they had retired from Middlebrook, some six miles towards Fre
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource], Important from Fredericksburg — the enemy Recrosses the Rappahannock. (search)
ont, and has recrossed the Rappahannock. I presume he is meditating a passage at some other point. R. E. Lre, Gen. Com'g. Nothing further was learned until the arrival of the train late in the afternoon, which brought down a confirmation of the dispatch, and the additional statement that they had stolen their dead from the field under cover of the night. No better evidence need be desired of the completeness of the victory on Saturday than this sudden and unexpected withdrawal of Burnside from the south side of the Rappahannock. It is a frank admission of a defeat and, whatever his future movements may be, this "change of base." will be regarded as a confession of the inability of his own forces to meet successfully those of the Confederacy. A gentleman who came down on the cars last night says that great disappointment was felt among our troops when they learned that the enemy had withdrawn without a second time offering battle. The general desire among the men was t
Progress of the War. Burnside's Fate Marked out. The Chicago Times, writing before the late battle, gives a little oid a battle if they choose to retreat. Where they go, Gen. Burnside must follow. If they mass their armies behind the fortel capital, they must be attacked and beaten there. If Gen Burnside is incompetent to perform this feat, he will be removednd within a day or two has volunteered the same advice to Burnside. Witness. "It is understood that the President has fu McClellan--and on which McClellan failed to act — to General Burnside, for the consideration and guidance of that officer. ing his army southward.--The same order has been given to Burnside, and if he does not obey it, off goes his head. If he doave but little doubt in that case that the generalship of Burnside and the valor of our troops would carry the old flag safeeavor to keep open its communication with Washington. If Burnside penetrated to Richmond, and maintained himself there for
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource], Important from Fredericksburg — the enemy Recrosses the Rappahannock. (search)
Burnside "Changing his Base." Burnside is imitating McClellan. He has already "changed his base" --that is to say, he has made a precipitate retreat. Our victory of Saturday must have been a tBurnside is imitating McClellan. He has already "changed his base" --that is to say, he has made a precipitate retreat. Our victory of Saturday must have been a tremendous one? It seems to have sickened him thoroughly. He has changed his base. The Yankee can change his base, but he cannot change his base nature. What now becomes of the comparison made e expect to learn that they have taken advantage of the opportunity before the operations of Gen. Burnside are fully developed to retreat ere retreat is rendered perilous or impossible." It seems, however, that the retreating has been done, not by the rebels, but by the Yankees. Burnside has had his Resting, and he has withdrawn. Will he try to have his Wagram still? We shall see. The gre that he will change his mind or his base before he gets five miles from the Rappahannock. Burnside fought the late battle on compulsion.--It was fight or die with him. He had no choice.--The par
hat Gen. Lee made the same calculation in arresting the advance of Burnside at Fredericksburg. He knew that be could not prevent him from cro to do, was to make him pay for his passage, if he wished to fight Burnside — which we presume he did — it was surely much better to make BurnBurnside come after him than for him to go across the river after Burnside. We observe that the Yankees already begin to compare Burnside's eBurnside. We observe that the Yankees already begin to compare Burnside's exploit with the two passages of the Danube by Napoleon in 1809--the first resulting in the battle of E ing, (the 21st and 22d May,) and the sBurnside's exploit with the two passages of the Danube by Napoleon in 1809--the first resulting in the battle of E ing, (the 21st and 22d May,) and the second in the battle of Wagram, (6th July.) There is a considerable difference, however, we venture to suggest. The first crossing, in May, wa cases was there much real opposition, or many men killed, whereas Burnside suffered severely in the passage. Again, it was May and July whenred severely in the passage. Again, it was May and July when Napoleon passed the Danube whereas Burnside has passed the Danube in Decembe
Burnside's report. In our issue of yesterday we laid before the public the report of the defeated Yankeee month ago yesterday by the Washington Star, that Burnside was nearer to Richmond that Lee — that be (BurnsidBurnside) would advance on the Richmond, Frederick burg and Potomac Railroad to Richmond, and that Lee would bastion ere would be a great battle at the Junction, where Burnside's enormous superiority of numbers would render vicostile Yankee has not been heard upon our pavement Burnside is where he was one month ago, but in a plight veread, however, of annoying our readers further with Burnside's direct lies and suppressions of the truth we wilnly war engaged, not more than 25,000 men at farth Burnside rates his own force engaged at 40,000. It was certainly double that figure Burnside writes that he lost but 5,000 men. General Armistead, of the Confederate se at least 5,000 of their men, and this may be what Burnside means when he says his loss was 5,000. The wounde
killed, Adj't Dadd killed. A telegram from Washington, dated the 14th says: "Gentlemen in high public positions repeat the assertion as coming from Gen. Burnside, that men enough, and therefore desires no further reinforcements." A letter from Baltimore to the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated the 13th, says: "GGen. Burnside nor our country can afford a defeat under existing circumstances." Referring to the battle of Saturday, the Baltimore American, of Tuesday evening, says: "The impression at Washington yesterday was that the battle will not be renewed for several days, unless the rebels bring it on. Gen Burnside has no doubtGen Burnside has no doubt fully ascertained the position and strength of the rebel defences, and will need time both to secure his own position and to prepare for further operations" The Washington Republican, (Lincoln's organ,) of the 17th, says: "At this writing we have nothing but the simple telegraphic announcement of yesterday morning fro
Creek, and passed on board of a boat, where they were kept until when they were paroled and our They report that during their they were generally kindly treated, with the exception that their allowance of rations was rather short. According to their statements, it is freely confessed by the Federal troops that they were signally defeated on Saturday, and that their loss for exceeded ours. They confirm the rumors we have received of the disaffection in the Yankee army, and think that Burnside could not have renewed the battle if he had desired to do so.--On their return from Aquia Creek to they saw some Federal forced but nothing like the of the army, which they think has been down the river. The to Fredericksburg is said to be than at first reported, though the destruction of property is very Only one or two houses in the town escaped the ravages of the in nearly every instance the furniture left by the departed inhabitants was destroyed. The pickets of the two ar
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