Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

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Captain Squires' rifles were the only ones of the battalion engaged. Down in front and to the right of the battalion at Sharpsburg was the bridge to be known as Burnside's, guarded by Toombs, and there Richardson, with two Napoleons, that afternoon drove to cover the first threatening movement of the enemy. On the morning of tGalbraith were engaged near Miller to nightfall, while Lieutenants Hawes and De Russy fought with Toombs. Lieut. J. D. Britton was wounded late in the evening. Burnside's bridge was a favorite field of activity with the Louisiana gunners that day. About noon on the 17th Eshleman was sent to guard the ford below Burnside's briBurnside's bridge, and he made a gallant fight against great odds, with orders to hold the enemy in check until A. P. Hill came up. When a heavy column crossing the fords on the extreme south of our line, threatened to carry disaster to that flank, Gen. D. H. Hill turned upon it three guns of Carter's battery and two of Donaldsonville artiller
ivity, but did not long continue it. Shortly after his return into Virginia he was relieved and Burnside appointed to the command. The field of Fredericksburg was singularly open as a fighting groud Fredericksburg. Two miles or less back from the river were our lines, defending earthworks. Burnside had at first sat down at Falmouth on the north side of the Rappahannock. This was an unwise moirected shots broke up the enemy's reserves, lying flat on their faces in the valley. This General Burnside called, by a bold but misleading figure of speech, holding the first ridge. A few shots byeets for safety. During the night of the 15th Fredericksburg was evacuated by the Federals. Burnside had abandoned his advance movement, presented with such a pomp of battle-array, glitter of steed chilled the gladness following Antietam; for the South, it had restored confidence. Reckless Burnside was replaced by Fighting Joe Hooker. Hooker began well. While Lee was watching him from his o