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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
e, which the Telegraph discovers in his book, and to which it gives expression as follows: Yet, we think all readers of this book will admit that, considering the inequality of strength brought into the field by the two belligerents, and of the vast superiority of the North, General Lee was far too fond of fighting. Many extracts might be made from it to show that such is the undoubted opinion of its author. Perhaps so. Unquestionably this opinion was shared by Generals McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker, Meade, and Grant, of the Federal Army of the Potomac. Now, there is the gist of the London telegraph's version of General Longstreet's criticism of General Lee. Our old chief was too fond of fighting. Well, who else is there in the Army of Northern Virginia who cannot pardon him for that weakness in consideration of the very brilliant results that almost invariably attended his exhibitions of pugnacity? In war it is said that nothing succeeds like success. In General Lee's c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
those who have sustained so unequal a struggle for all that is dear to man. In anticipation of that time, I will call attention to some facts which will show the tremendous odds the Confederate armies had to encounter. Mr. Secretary Stanton's report shows that the available strength present for duty in the army with which General Grant commenced the campaign of 1864 was, on 1st of May, 1864, as follows: The Army of the Potomac (under Gen. Meade)120,386 The Ninth Army Corps (under Gen. Burnside)20,780 ——— Aggregate141,166 Beside this, he says the chief part of the force designed to guard the Middle Department and the Department of Washington was called to the front to repair losses in the Army of the Potomac, which doubtless was done before that army left the vicinity of Spotsylvania Courthouse, as General Grant says: The 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th (of May, 1864) were consumed in manoeuvering and waiting for re inforcements from Washington, and Mr. Stanton
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
In the latter part of the month of November, 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, commanded by Colonel R. L. T. Beale, held position on the extreme right of General Lee's army on the Rappahannock, and were encamped in the vicinity of Lloyd's, in Essex county. The duties of the regiment were to guard the river shore with an extended line of pickets. These pickets were frequently aroused and entertained by the passage up the river of Federal gunboats and transports, communicating with Burnside's army at Fredericksburg. Quite frequently, also, an exchange of rifle shots was made with the Federal pickets on the Northern Neck shore of the river. Many men of this regiment had their homes and families on that side of the river, and the sight of the Union horsemen riding unchecked over the roads and fields so familiar to them aroused in many breasts an intense desire to cross the river and strike the enemy a blow. Into this feeling none entered more heartily than the Colonel himse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
will be furnished with a guide to any point in Virginia. It so happened that some of the men had attended William and Mary College as students, and knew the roads as well as their own in Fauquier. The Black Horse took part in the raid around McClellan, simply for observation, and it is a miracle that they were not all captured. Valuable service. No historian has yet been born who could follow the Black Horse in the role it played in the seven days fight. General Lee, learning that Burnside had moved by sea from North Carolina to reinforce General Pope, as McClellan was at Fredericksburg, sent General Stuart with his brigade, of which the Black Horse formed a part, to make a reconnoisance in that direction. The Black Horse saw some very active service and gained information that proved valuable to the army. They afterwards helped to drive Pope across the Rappahannock, and now being in that part of the State in which many of them were reared, the troop was called upon to furn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
raggart, had made good use of his Headquarters in the Saddle to get out of Virginia, and had learned all about Lines of Retreat. The 22d Regiment took part in the reduction and capture of Harper's Ferry on August 15th, where it remained until the 17th, the day the battle of Sharpsburg was fought. On that day the regiment, with the rest of A. P. Hill's Division, arrived on the battle-field after a forced march of seventeen miles, in time to aid in the afternoon in the decided repulse of Burnside's attack at the Stone Bridge, thereby preventing the turning of General Lee's right and saving the day to the Confederates. On the night of the 18th the army recrossed the Potomac, and on the 19th was followed by a division of Federals, which was promptly attacked by a part of A. P. Hill's command, routed and driven back across the Potomac at Shepherdstown with great slaughter. The 22d took an active part in this successful fight. After the enemy had been driven into the river, a heavy f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
oldier, that strong efforts were made to bring him over. The temptations held out to him were great enough to shake any man of less strength than he. McClellan, Burnside, even the Government itself, made advances to forestall Buckner's evident intention to precipitate himself into the Confederacy. Among the unprinted archives in the War Department, is a telegram sent early in 1861 by Burnside to Buckner, adjuring him to take no steps until he could be seen personally. I have just come from the President, telegraphed Burnside, indicating that Mr. Lincoln was willing to do something to hold such a man to the Union cause. What that something was, is not Burnside, indicating that Mr. Lincoln was willing to do something to hold such a man to the Union cause. What that something was, is not certainly known, but it is said to have been a commission as general in the rapidly gathering armies of the North, although there was then no lack of material for general officers. Mc-Clellan appears to have thought that he was a man of capacity and promise in such a crisis, and did all in his power to prevent Buckner going astra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
nt lost four officers and eighty-four men. The 28th also did its part nobly on the morning of the 12th of May, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, when Johnson's front was broken, and Lane's North Carolina veterans turned the tide of Federal victory as it came surging to the right. It was also with the brigade the afternoon of the same day, when, under General Lee's orders and in his presence, it crossed the works in front of Spotsylvania Courthouse, and in that brilliant flank movement handled Burnside's Corps so roughly and relieved Johnson's front. Its loss in these two engagements was five officers and 121 men. On the afternoon of the 21st it moved to the right of the Courthouse, and made a reconnoissance, in which Lieutenant E. S. Edwards was killed and two men wounded. At Jericho Ford, on the 23d of May, the 28th advanced as far as any of the troops engaged, held its ground until relieved that night, and removed all its dead and wounded. Its loss was two officers and twenty-e