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. Ephraim Bailey, Joseph Swan, Nathan Wait,Constables. Joseph Wyman, Jeduthan Richardson,Surveyors of Highways. Samuel Tufts, jun., Gersham Teel,Tything-men. James T. Floyd, Andrew Blanchard,Cullers of Hoops and Staves. William Bradbury, Benjamin Tufts,Fence-viewers. Jeduthan Richardson, Joseph Wyman, Jonathan Harrington,Surveyors of Lumber. Calvin Turner, Thatcher Magoon, Timothy Dexter, John Dixen, Darius Wait, Jonathan Harrington,Measurers of Wood. Timothy Dexter, John Burrage, Ephraim Bailey, Joseph Church, Jonathan Warner, David Willis, Clerk of the Market. Fitch Hall,Fire-wards. John Hosmer, Jeduthan Richardson, Andrew Blanchard, Abner Bartlett, Richard Hall,To audit the Treasurer's Accounts. Fitch Hall, Nathaniel Hall, Hezekiah Blanchard,To execute the Fish Act. Nathan Wait, Andrew Blanchard, Seth Tufts,Field-drivers and Hog-reeves. Joseph Blodgett, Joseph Church, Joseph Wyman, Ebenezer Symonds, Gershom Tufts, Daniel Tufts, Andrew Bla
more correct. See Jackson's Hist. of Newton. 3. John, s. of John (2), m. Mary Spring 30 Nov. 1681, and had Sarah, b. 25 Mar. 1685, m. William Trowbridge about 1707, and d. 1720. She is supposed by A. H. Ward, Esq., to have been the only child of her parents, who survived her. John the f. was Representative of Newton ten years, and d. 5 June 1727; his w. Mary d. 20 Ap. 1731, a. 71. 4. Richard, s. of John (2), m. Thankful Trowbridge 15 Dec. 1690, and had Lydia, b. 13 Aug. 1692, m. John Burrage 9 Oct. 1718; Thomas, b. 8 Jan. 1693-4, m. Sarah Mattocks; James, b. 6 Jan. 1695, d. young; Hannah, b. 13 May 1697, m. Joshua Gay of Dedham 15 Mar. 1732; William, b. 12 Sept. 1699, m. Elizabeth Wilson; James, b. 14 Aug. 1701, m. Mary Bacon; Ephraim, b. 1703; Margaret, b. 28 Feb. 1705-6. Richard the f. was Representative of Newton eight years, and Deacon of the Church; he d. 27 Mar. 1739; his w. Thankful d. 17 Sept 1742, a. 75. Warland, Owen, m. Hannah Gay 3 Ap. 1679, and had William, b
more correct. See Jackson's Hist. of Newton. 3. John, s. of John (2), m. Mary Spring 30 Nov. 1681, and had Sarah, b. 25 Mar. 1685, m. William Trowbridge about 1707, and d. 1720. She is supposed by A. H. Ward, Esq., to have been the only child of her parents, who survived her. John the f. was Representative of Newton ten years, and d. 5 June 1727; his w. Mary d. 20 Ap. 1731, a. 71. 4. Richard, s. of John (2), m. Thankful Trowbridge 15 Dec. 1690, and had Lydia, b. 13 Aug. 1692, m. John Burrage 9 Oct. 1718; Thomas, b. 8 Jan. 1693-4, m. Sarah Mattocks; James, b. 6 Jan. 1695, d. young; Hannah, b. 13 May 1697, m. Joshua Gay of Dedham 15 Mar. 1732; William, b. 12 Sept. 1699, m. Elizabeth Wilson; James, b. 14 Aug. 1701, m. Mary Bacon; Ephraim, b. 1703; Margaret, b. 28 Feb. 1705-6. Richard the f. was Representative of Newton eight years, and Deacon of the Church; he d. 27 Mar. 1739; his w. Thankful d. 17 Sept 1742, a. 75. Warland, Owen, m. Hannah Gay 3 Ap. 1679, and had William, b
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1862. (search)
r 29, 1863. Joseph Perrin Burrage was born in Boston, May 4, 1842, the son of Joseph and Frances (Perrin) Burrage. Through his father he was descended from John Burrage, who settled in Lynn about 1630. Through his mother he was related to Hon. D. P. Thompson, the well-known novelist of Vermont, and also to Count Rumford. He illside were strewn the wounded, the dying, the dead. Two thirds the way up the ascent, falling in the second charge while cheering on his men, the body of Lieutenant Burrage lay peacefully in the soft white moonlight. He fell in his early prime, scarce twenty-one years of age, struck by a ball which pierced his heart. LieuteLieutenant Burrage had great simplicity of character. He was thoroughly honest, and transparent as crystal. There was a great charm in his naturalness and guilelessness, his unaffected modesty and truthfulness. He had also great kindness of heart. No one was readier than he to do a favor, and to do it without seeming to impose an ob
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
ide, A. E., Maj.-Gen., I. 45, 83;, 84,105, 111, 246, 247, 348, 372, 426, 427II. 39, 109, 110, 170, 187, 252, 253, 341. Burrage, John, II. 268 Burrage, Joseph, II. 268. Burrage, J. P., Lieut., Memoir, II. 268-269. Burrage, Sophia, II. 268Burrage, Joseph, II. 268. Burrage, J. P., Lieut., Memoir, II. 268-269. Burrage, Sophia, II. 268. Burrill, Adelaide V., II. 235. Butler, B. F., Maj.-Gen., 1. 100, 344; II. 40, 83;, 383. C. Cabot, Francis, I. 395. Cabot, Miss, II. 172. Caldwell, J. C., Maj.-Gen., I. 103. Cameron, Simon, I. 258. Camp, H. W., II. 80. CaBurrage, J. P., Lieut., Memoir, II. 268-269. Burrage, Sophia, II. 268. Burrill, Adelaide V., II. 235. Butler, B. F., Maj.-Gen., 1. 100, 344; II. 40, 83;, 383. C. Cabot, Francis, I. 395. Cabot, Miss, II. 172. Caldwell, J. C., Maj.-Gen., I. 103. Cameron, Simon, I. 258. Camp, H. W., II. 80. Capen, C. J., II. 105. Carley, L. H., II. 58. Carroll Family, II. 423. Carter, Elizabeth, II. 64. Cary, Richard, Capt., I. 265; II. 144, 186;, 258. Case, Capt., II. 109. Casey, Silas, Maj.-Gen., I. 432. Chadwick, J. C., Capt., II.Burrage, Sophia, II. 268. Burrill, Adelaide V., II. 235. Butler, B. F., Maj.-Gen., 1. 100, 344; II. 40, 83;, 383. C. Cabot, Francis, I. 395. Cabot, Miss, II. 172. Caldwell, J. C., Maj.-Gen., I. 103. Cameron, Simon, I. 258. Camp, H. W., II. 80. Capen, C. J., II. 105. Carley, L. H., II. 58. Carroll Family, II. 423. Carter, Elizabeth, II. 64. Cary, Richard, Capt., I. 265; II. 144, 186;, 258. Case, Capt., II. 109. Casey, Silas, Maj.-Gen., I. 432. Chadwick, J. C., Capt., II. 154. Chamberlain, J. L., Col., II. 74. Chancellor, Mr., I. 146. Chandler, P. W., Hon., I. 327, 329;. Channing, W. H., Rev., I. 45, 47;. Chapin, Edward, Private, Memoir, II. 425-432. Chapin, Nicholas, II. 425. Chapin, Samuel, II
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Reminiscences of an earlier Medford. (search)
held to heroic practices in matters dietetic; he is reported to have said that the reason why mince-pies hurt people was because they did not make them rich enough. The sidewalk in front of Mr. Turell Tufts' house used to be our favorite resort for a game of marbles. We found a pleasant shade under the two mighty buttonwoods, and the ground was smooth and hard. Here on a pleasant day might have been seen Parson Stetson's sons, the Halls, Lawrences, Clisbys, Sam Gregg, Charley Ballou, John Burrage, and others who shall be nameless. Charles Ballou was a dead shot at marbles, and when he aimed at your alley, six feet off, it was a good plan to say good-by to it. When the play became noisy, Mr. Tufts would sally out from his front door, wildly flourish his cane, and order us off. So David Copperfield's Aunt Betsey Trotwood used to rush out to drive the intrusive donkey from her green. We obeyed, but the retreat was only temporary; we went back as soon as the old gentleman resumed h