hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 7 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 21 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.75 (search)
e ferry-boats Westfield and Clifton, the latter under Lieutenant-Commander R. L. Law; the Harriet Lane, Commander J. M. Wainwright, and the Owasco, Lieutenant-Commander John Guest, took possession of Galveston in October without a conflict. Colonel Burrell, with only 260 men, was sent — to hold the town. The flotilla, which carried a heavy armament, was disposed about the harbor and bay, and held the town for two months, but without proper precautions against attack. At daybreak on the 1strender of all the vessels. The Clifton carried this message to the Westfield, and took back Renshaw's refusal, after which she executed her orders, which were to take the vessels out of the harbor. Meantime the enemy had moved up their lines. Burrell surrendered the town, and the Westfield, getting aground, was set on fire at Renshaw's order, and blew up prematurely, killing Renshaw and several of his men. Law, of the Clifton, now the senior officer, immediately steamed away, and the blockad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
ry and naval disaster in which three companies of the 42d Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were taken prisoners by the Confederates under Magruder. On the 21st of December three companies of the 42d Massachusetts, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were dispatched from New Orleans, without disembarking. Holcomb's 2d Vermont battery was sent with them, but, waiting for its horses to arrive, did not go ashore. Burrell landed at Kuhn's wharf on the 24th, took nominal possession of the town, but really occupied only the wharf itself, protected by barricades and the 32 gunseless condition of the coast, menaced as it was by the blockading fleet; thus it happened that Burrell's three companies found themselves confronted by two brigades (Scurry's and Sibley's, under Col the white flag, first displayed on the Harriet Lane, was flying from all the fleet. Thereupon Burrell surrendered. The Confederates ceased firing on him as soon as they perceived his signal; but t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
ring the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,579.00; in 1862, $12,594.75; in 1863, $17,717.70; in 1864, $16,000.00; in 1865, $9,400.00. Total amount, $58,291.45. Roxbury Incorporated as a town, Sept. 28, 1630; as a city, March 12, 1846; annexed to Boston, June 1, 1867. Population in 1860, 25,137; in 1865, 28,426. Valuation in 1860, $24,000,000; in 1865, $23,808,776. In 1861, William Gaston, mayor; Samuel Little, Isaac S. Burrell, J. C. Pratt, Charles Stanwood, Gideon B. Richmond, Robert Hale, Samuel C. Cobb, Oliver J. Curtis, aldermen. In 1862, William Gaston, mayor; Samuel Little, Samuel C. Cobb, Ariel Low, Charles Stanwood, Gideon B. Richmond, William R. Huston, Phineas B. Smith, Thomas H. Lester, aldermen. In 1863, George Lewis, mayor; Samuel Little, Phineas B. Smith, James E. Adams, Gideon B. Richmond, William R. Huston, Moses H. Day, John H. Lester, Ivory Harmon, alder men. In 1864, George Lewis, mayor;
Forty-second regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), the 41st Mass. Infantry became the 3d Mass. Cavalry. 9 months and 100 days service. Col. Isaac S. Burrell (9 months and 100 days). Field and Staff.Line.companies.Unassigned Recruits.Totals. ABCDEFGHIK Number on regimental rolls,— 9 months,— Officers,932–––––––– left the State November 21 for the rendezvous at Long Island, N. Y. It left for Mississippi in four detachments early in December. Companies D, G and I under Colonel Burrell, reaching Carrollton on the 17th, were ordered to Galveston, Tex., and, co-operating with the naval forces, established a post on the island. On Jan. 1, 1863in Geo. J. Sanger, unconditionally released, and a parole camp was established at Bayou Gentilly, which they occupied until the termination of their service. Colonel Burrell, Surgeon A. J. Cummings, the officers of companies D, G and I, with Lieutenant Stowell of Company E, were held in prison, where Surgeon Cummings
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Forty-second regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). (search)
were detailed for engineer duty. Five of the companies were reunited at headquarters in June. A detachment under Lieutenant Tinkham took part in the action at La Fourche Crossing June 21, and a detachment under First Sergeant George W. Ballou suffered loss in the attack and capture of Brashear City on the 23d. The regiment spent the remainder of its service stationed at New Orleans and Algiers, and on July 31 prepared for its return to Massachusetts. It reached Boston August 10 and was mustered out at Readville Aug. 20, 1863. In the summer of 1864 the regiment was recruited and reorganized for one hundred days service, with the same field officers. It left the State July 24 under Lieutenant-Colonel Stedman, and Colonel Burrell returning from his prison confinement, joined the command at Alexandria, where it spent its term of service on guard and patrol duty, detachments serving in guard of supply trains to the Shenandoah Valley. It was mustered out of service Nov. 11, 1864.