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oping upon the ground, and highly complimented us, saying that he had been anxiously watching us, at the same time observing the enemy's movements along the Edwards's Ferry road. If the truth must be told, he directed our movements from his office in town, two miles away — or between that point and Fort Evans--and was swearing lustily all the afternoon; yet, although he fondly expected the enemy to approach the fort, they did not do so; hence every disposition was made at Ball's Bluff by Colonel Burt, of the Eighteenth, who fell while cheering on the four right companies in their headlong massacre of the enemy. Another remarkable fact: when the Yankees had safely reached the shores of Maryland, they began to cheer like madmen, but for what, will ever remain a mystery. One of the boys dryly remarked, that the darned fools cheered because they got back safely! Others said, they cheered because they felt so mighty big over another victory! Both were probably near the truth! Our w
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 43 (search)
P. M. A brisk cannonade down the river is distinctly heard. It is not supposed to be a serious matter,--perhaps we are shelling Gen. Butler's observatory, erected within his lines to overlook ours. September 15 Bright and pleasant. The firing was from our gun-boats and two batteries, on Gen. Butler's canal to turn the channel of the river. Our fondly-cherished visions of peace have vanished like a mirage of the desert; and there is general despondency among the croakers. Mr. Burt, of South Carolina (late member of Congress), writes from Abbeville that Vice-President A. H Stephens crossed the Savannah River, when Sherman's raiders were galloping through the country, in great alarm. To the people near him he spoke freely on public affairs, and criticised the President's policy severely, and the conduct of the war generally. He said the enemy might now go where he pleased, our strength and resources were exhausted, and that we ought to make peace. That we could elect
we lived in the house next door to the United States Hotel, and went in to our meals across a little bridge that communicated with the dining-room. Governor McWillie, of Mississippi, and his family, Mr. and Mrs. Toombs, of Georgia, and Mr. and Mrs. Burt, of South Carolina, made up our mess. Mrs. Burt was the niece of Mr. Calhoun, and a very handsome and amiable woman. Her husband was a strong-hearted, faithful, honest man who agreed with Mr. Calhoun in most things. We did not know his full Mrs. Burt was the niece of Mr. Calhoun, and a very handsome and amiable woman. Her husband was a strong-hearted, faithful, honest man who agreed with Mr. Calhoun in most things. We did not know his full worth then, and mistook him for simply an elegant man, formed to adorn society; but when he was tried by the fires of adversity, the metal that was in him shone without a grain of alloy. Mr. and Mrs. Toombs were both comparatively young, and one could scarcely imagine a wittier and more agreeable companion than he was. He was a university man, and had kept up his classics. He had the personal habits of a fine gentleman, and talked such grammar determinately, not ignorantly, as the negroes
ices to the National Government, and the offer was accepted. Colonel De Courcy commanded a Turkish regiment during the Crimean War.--Louisville Journal, September 11. At Portland, Me., Cyrus F. Sargent and Octavius F. Hill, of Yarmouth, were arrested to-day by the United States Marshal, by order of the Secretary of War.--James Chapin, of Vicksburg, reported to be a captain in the rebel army, was arrested at the residence of his father-in-law, in Saratoga, N. Y., to-day, by U. S. Marshal Burt, of Albany, by virtue of a warrant of the Secretary of State.--At Boston, Mass., James Leguire, hailing from Halifax, N. C., was arrested on charges of conspiring against the Government. He was committed for trial at the U. S. District Court. Bail was refused. Leguire was bound for Memphis. A uniform was found in his trunk, and other suspicious circumstances led to the arrest.--N. Y. World, September 5. The schooner H. Middleton arrived at New York, a prize to the United States, havi
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
se services were frequently put in requisition by Major-General Pope, commanding the Army of the Mississippi, was employed upon almost every reconnaissance made by the Army of the Mississippi, and procured most of the information obtained relative to the enemy's position in front of our left. He was always cool and gallant, and his services were essentially useful. I hope he may receive the promotion his abilities and efforts have deserved and for which he has been recommended. First Lieutenant Burt, aide-de-camp, has also constantly been ready, active, and fearless 16 the discharge of duty, and the same remarks apply to Lieut. James E. Merriman, Twenty-sixth Illinois, acting aide-de-camp, and to First Lieutenant Nazro, quartermaster and commissary. Dr. Charles H. Rawson, medical director, is entitled to high praise for his wise suggestions as to and enforcement of sanitary measures. A list of the killed, wounded, and missing and the reports of subordinate commanders are in
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
el Barksdale's (Thirteenth) Mississippi regiment. Five others, under Colonel Baker's immediate direction, crossed the river at the same time at Ball's Bluff, and were met by Hunton's (Eighth Virginia), Featherston's (Seventeenth Mississippi), and Burt's (Eighteenth Mississippi) regiments, and after an obstinate contest driven over Ball's Bluff in such a panic that numbers rushed into the river and were drowned. Colonel Baker had fallen on the field. Brigadier-General Evans reported that the Confederate loss was thirty-six killed, including the gallant Colonel Burt, one hundred and seventeen wounded, and two captured; and that of the enemy, thirteen hundred killed, wounded, and drowned, and seven hundred and ten prisoners. Colonel Barksdale attacked a superior force next day in advance of Edwards's Ferry, and drove it back to the river, which it recrossed in the night. At the end of October the effective total of the army (by the return in my possession) was twenty-seven
ture, which we had not scrupled to purchase at the sacrifices the God above us had seen proper to exact. The movement on the right wing of our army upon the batteries in front, which seemed to have been resolved on early in the action, was at length made. About the time of our final charge upon the enemy's right, which drove them from the field, Gen. Jones, with the Fifth South Carolina regiment, Col. Jenkins, and the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Mississippi regiments, Cols. Featherston and Burt moved round to gain the rear of the batteries over the hill. above Mitchell's Ford. Gen. Bonham, with the Third and Seventh South Carolina regiments, Cols. Williams and Bacon, moved up the hill in front. The enemy, though in considerable force, at once recoiled from the encounter; and, unlimbering their artillery, they made their way with the utmost rapidity in the direction of Centreville. It was too late for pursuit — too late to intercept the retreating columns from the west, already un
r's division. The Federals were found to be strongly intrenched, and as soon as our skirmishers came in view they were opened upon with a furious cannonade from a park of field-pieces. Kemper's battery now went to the front, and for three hours the battle raged hotly, when the discomfited Yankees again resumed their back track. It was during this fight that General Griffith, of Mississippi, one of the heroes of Leesburgh, (where he commanded the Eighteenth Mississippi, on the fall of Colonel Burt,) was killed by the fragment of a shell, which mangled one of his legs. He was the only general officer killed on our side during the whole of that bloody week. Owing to a most unfortunate accident much of our success was marred. Our own troops, being mistaken for the enemy, were fired into by the Twenty-first Mississippi regiment, as was Jenkins's South-Carolina regiment at Manassas, by reenforcements in the rear. During the pursuit the railroad Merrimac was far in advance of our men
my detachment thus exposed so considerably in front of all others, both flanks in air, was obliged to cease to advance, and confine themselves to holding their own. At five o'clock, thinking, though at the risk of exposing my fighting line to being enfiladed, that I might drive the enemy by an unexpected attack through the woods, I brought up additionally the most of Birney's regiments — the Fourth Maine, Colonel Walker and Lieut.-Col. Carver; Fortieth New-York, Col. Egan; First New-York, Major Burt; One Hundred and First New-York, Lieut.-Col. Gesner--and changed front to the left to sweep with a rush the first line of the enemy. This was most successful. The enemy rolled up on his own right; it presaged a victory for us all. Still our force was too light. The enemy brought up rapidly heavy reserves, so that our further progress was impeded. General Stevens came up gallantly in action to support us, but did not have the numbers. On the morning of the thirtieth, Gen. Ricketts, w
my detachment thus exposed so considerably in front of all others, both flanks in air, was obliged to cease to advance, and confine themselves to holding their own. At five o'clock, thinking, though at the risk of exposing my fighting line to being enfiladed, that I might drive the enemy by an unexpected attack through the woods, I brought up additionally the most of Birney's regiments — the Fourth Maine, Colonel Walker and Lieut.-Col. Carver; Fortieth New-York, Col. Egan; First New-York, Major Burt; One Hundred and First New-York, Lieut.-Col. Gesner--and changed front to the left to sweep with a rush the first line of the enemy. This was most successful. The enemy rolled up on his own right; it presaged a victory for us all. Still our force was too light. The enemy brought up rapidly heavy reserves, so that our further progress was impeded. General Stevens came up gallantly in action to support us, but did not have the numbers. On the morning of the thirtieth, Gen. Ricketts, w
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