Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Burt or search for Burt in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

r's division. The Federals were found to be strongly intrenched, and as soon as our skirmishers came in view they were opened upon with a furious cannonade from a park of field-pieces. Kemper's battery now went to the front, and for three hours the battle raged hotly, when the discomfited Yankees again resumed their back track. It was during this fight that General Griffith, of Mississippi, one of the heroes of Leesburgh, (where he commanded the Eighteenth Mississippi, on the fall of Colonel Burt,) was killed by the fragment of a shell, which mangled one of his legs. He was the only general officer killed on our side during the whole of that bloody week. Owing to a most unfortunate accident much of our success was marred. Our own troops, being mistaken for the enemy, were fired into by the Twenty-first Mississippi regiment, as was Jenkins's South-Carolina regiment at Manassas, by reenforcements in the rear. During the pursuit the railroad Merrimac was far in advance of our men
my detachment thus exposed so considerably in front of all others, both flanks in air, was obliged to cease to advance, and confine themselves to holding their own. At five o'clock, thinking, though at the risk of exposing my fighting line to being enfiladed, that I might drive the enemy by an unexpected attack through the woods, I brought up additionally the most of Birney's regiments — the Fourth Maine, Colonel Walker and Lieut.-Col. Carver; Fortieth New-York, Col. Egan; First New-York, Major Burt; One Hundred and First New-York, Lieut.-Col. Gesner--and changed front to the left to sweep with a rush the first line of the enemy. This was most successful. The enemy rolled up on his own right; it presaged a victory for us all. Still our force was too light. The enemy brought up rapidly heavy reserves, so that our further progress was impeded. General Stevens came up gallantly in action to support us, but did not have the numbers. On the morning of the thirtieth, Gen. Ricketts, w
my detachment thus exposed so considerably in front of all others, both flanks in air, was obliged to cease to advance, and confine themselves to holding their own. At five o'clock, thinking, though at the risk of exposing my fighting line to being enfiladed, that I might drive the enemy by an unexpected attack through the woods, I brought up additionally the most of Birney's regiments — the Fourth Maine, Colonel Walker and Lieut.-Col. Carver; Fortieth New-York, Col. Egan; First New-York, Major Burt; One Hundred and First New-York, Lieut.-Col. Gesner--and changed front to the left to sweep with a rush the first line of the enemy. This was most successful. The enemy rolled up on his own right; it presaged a victory for us all. Still our force was too light. The enemy brought up rapidly heavy reserves, so that our further progress was impeded. General Stevens came up gallantly in action to support us, but did not have the numbers. On the morning of the thirtieth, Gen. Ricketts, w