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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Horace Bushnell or search for Horace Bushnell in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
lanthropist, Birney disclaimed the compliment. Our country was asleep, whilst slavery was preparing to pour its leprous distilment into her ears. So deep was becoming her sleep that nothing but a rude and almost ruffianlike shake could rouse her to a contemplation of her danger. If she is saved, it is because she has been thus treated (Lib. 7.2). But Channing took the professional clerical view of the matter, as was shown two years later by an eminent Congregational clergyman, the Rev. Horace Bushnell, of Hartford, in a discourse on slavery. The first movement here at the North, said he, was a rank onset and explosion. . . . The first sin of this organization was a sin of ill-manners. They did not go to work like Christian gentlemen. . . . The great convention which met at Philadelphia, drew up a declaration of their sentiments . . . by which they wilfully and boorishly cast off the whole South from them (Lib. 9.29). and of other publications within his knowledge, any one could
y Society, early desideratum with G., 1.268, 346, 376; convention called, 392, assembles, 397, proceedings, 399-415; Declaration of Sentiments, 408, censured by H. Bushnell, 2.132; constitution and officers, 1.414; proffered aid to Lib., 433; first anniversary, 446, mobbed by colonizationists, 447; publications, 483; protest againset, J., Rev., at World's Convention, 2.370, 372. Burns, Anthony, 2.20. Burr, Aaron [1756-1836], A. S. vote in N. Y., 1.275; interview with G., 276. Bushnell, Horace, Rev. [2802-1876], 2.132. Butler, Benjamin Franklin [b. 1818], 1.258. Buxton, Thomas Fowell [1786-1845], English abolitionist, 1.146; M. P., successor of Wigainst itinerant moralists, 2.130, 135; Mass. Pastoral Letter, 133-136, 198.—See also J. S. C. Abbott, N. Adams, G. Allen, L. Bacon, L. Beecher, G. W. Blagden, H. Bushnell, A. Cummings, C. G. Finney, C. Fitch, R. B. Hall, J. Le Bosquet, N. Lord, A. A. Phelps, G. Shepherd, C. B. Storrs, M. Stuart, M. Thacher, C. T. Torrey, J. H. To