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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
feriority would make our condition abject and miserable beyond what freeman can imagine. Subjugation involves everything that the torturing malice and devilish ingenuity of our foes can suggest — the destruction of our nationality, the equalization of whites and blacks, the obliteration of State lines, degradation to colonial vassalage, and the reduction of many of our citizens to dreary, hopeless, remediless bondage. A hostile police would keep order in every town and city. Judges, like Busteed, would hold our courts, protected by Yankee soldiers. Churches would be filled by Yankee or tory preachers. Every office would be bestowed on aliens. Absenteeism would curse us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past, or foreign countries, need not be sough
iority would make our condition abject and miserable beyond what freemen can imagine. Subjugation involves every thing that the torturing malice and devilish ingenuity of our foes can suggest. The destruction of our nationality, the equalization of whites and blacks, the obliteration of State lines, degradation to colonial vassalage, and the reduction of many of our citizens to dreary, hopeless, remediless bondage. A hostile police would keep order in every town and city. Judges, like Busteed, would hold our courts, protected by Yankee soldiers. Churches would be filled by Yankee or tory preachers. Every office would be bestowed on aliens. Absenteeism would curse us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past of foreign countries need not be sought
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Delaware Volunteers. (search)
of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D. C., May 1-12. Grand review May 23. Mustered out June 3, 1865. Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 46 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 80 Enlisted men by disease. Total 135. 4th Delaware Regiment Infantry. Organized at Wilmington, Del., June to November, 1862. Ordered to Baltimore, Md., September, 1862. Attached to Defenses of Baltimore, 8th Army Corps, Middle Dept., to December, 1862. Busteed's Independent Brigade, 4th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1863. King's Independent Brigade, 4th Army Corps, to June, 1863. Unattached, 4th Army Corps, to July. Unassigned, King's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to January, 1864. Tyler's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
eptember 2-6. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Nashville Campaign November and December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Transferred to 1st Regiment Illinois Light Artillery as Battery B, December 21, 1864, which see. Battery lost during service 2 Officers and 7 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 20 Enlisted men by disease. Total 29. Busteed's Independent Battery Light Artillery Chicago Light Artillery. Organized at Chicago, Ill., October 1, 1861. Moved to Washington, D. C., October 1-4. Disbanded and transferred to 1st New York Light Artillery November 9, 1861. Chicago Board of Trade Independent Battery Light Artillery Organized at Chicago, Ill., and mustered in August 1, 1862. Moved to Louisville, Ky., September 9-11. Attached to Dumont's 12th Division, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. Pioneer Bri
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
a., September, 1862. Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, December, 1862. Busteed's Independent Brigade, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1863. District of Hilton Head, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to June, 1863.ered in September 9, 1862. Left State for Fortress Monroe, Va., September 11, 1862. Attached to Camp Hamilton, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. Busteed's Independent Brigade, Yorktown, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. West's Brigade, 7th Army Corps, to May, 1863. West's Advance Brigad Organized at Newburg, N. Y., and mustered in February 11, 1863. Left State for Baltimore, Md., February 12, 1863; thence moved to Norfolk, Va. Attached to Busteed's Independent Brigade, 4th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. King's Independent Brigade, 4th Army Corps, to June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Divisi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
ill December 1. Moved to Washington, D. C., thence to Fortress Monroe and Yorktown, Va., December 1-7, and to Gloucester Point, Va., December 8. Attached to Busteed's Independent Brigade, Yorktown, Va., 4th Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. King's Independent Brigade, 4th Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1863. Regiment Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg October 22-November 27, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., December 5; thence to Newport News, Va. Attached to Busteed's Brigade, 4th Corps, Dept. of Virginia, December, 1862, to April, 1863. West's Independent Brigade, 4th Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1863. West's Adva Regiment Infantry. Organized at Philadelphia and Harrisburg October 23 to December 6, 1862. Ordered to Fortress Monroe, Va., December, 1862. Attached to Busteed's Independent Brigade, 4th Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1863. West's Independent Brigade, 4th Corps, to June, 1863. King's Independent Brigade, 4th C
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 7 (search)
The reason why I advise the slave to be guided by a policy of peace is because he has no chance. If he had one,--if he had as good a chance as those who went up to Lexington, eventy-seven years ago,--I should call him the basest recreant that ever deserted wife and child if he did not vindicate his liberty by his own right hand. [Cheers.] And I am not by any means certain that Northern men would not be startled-would not be wholesomely startled — by one or two such cases as a scoundrel Busteed shot over his perjured affidavit. If a Morton or a Curtis could be shot on the commissioner's bench by the hand of him they sought to sacrifice, I have no doubt that it would have a wholesome effect. [Great applause.] Is there a man here who would, if he had arms in his hands, either himself go to Georgia, or let any one near and dear to him go there, without sending somebody before him to a lighter and cooler place than a Georgian plantation? I am not dealing with the cause of three m
sorrowful journey. The body will be conveyed to its destination in Connecticut this morning. The countenance of the deceased wears a natural and composed expression. The wound caused by the fatal bullet can be seen under the left eye. The deceased is crossed in the same uniform that he wore on the battle field. The Sons of Connecticut met at No. 30 Pine street, yesterday afternoon, Robert H. McCurdy in the chair; Charles Gould, Secretary. Among the gentlemen were Gov. Buckingham, Gen. Busteed, Col. Almy, Waldo Hutchins, Judge Coles, and the members of the late General's staff. After brief remarks by several members of the Society, the following resolutions were adopted: Resolved, That while we mourn the sacrifice of every gallant life given in battle to preserve the life of the nation, and sympathize with the bereaved friends of every Union soldier, we cannot but feel with more intensity the tearful cost of victory when death strikes at those who are the pride and the ho
artial law he would not be able to got far up Broadway. Butler was told this and said: "If that man Dean understands me, he will find it very convenient to leave in a short time." [Applause.] Ex-Surveyor Andrews then, being introduced by Mr. Busteed, said: The people of this country have made up their minds that this rebellion is to be suppressed ["Bully for you"] and the people have made up their minds that Abraham Lincoln is the man to suppress it. [Cheers.] And they have made up their n of Seymour and his infernal exhorts, who have raised themselves up against the prosecution of this war since the firing of Fort Seymour. [A voice--"Send him to the State prison."] That is too good a place for him. [Groans for Seymour.] Mr. Busteed proposed three cheers for Governor Morton, which were given with a hearty good will. "John Brown" was called for, to which some one responded, "Do let John Brown's bones rest for a few minutes." [Cheers and laughter.] At half-past 10
negro suffrage. Comptroller Clark, of the Currency Bureau, has decided that ladies cannot act as directors of National Banks, as the laws do not recognize them as citizens. Clever executed counterfeit coin of the nickel three-cent denomination are noticed in circulation. It is made of some kind of an alloyed metal, which is much softer and lighter than the genuine coin. In consequence of the refusal of General Woods, commanding in Alabama, to obey a writ of habeas corpus, Judge Busteed has indignantly adjourned the United States Court for the Middle District. The Macon (Ga.) Telegraph has good authority for saying that Provisional Governor Johnson has received instructions from Washington not to vacate the chair of State until further advised. The freight agent of the Louisville and Nashville railroad announces that the restrictions on shipments of freight to Atlanta and the South have been removed. The First National Bank of Danville, Virginia, J. F. Fi
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