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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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rously gave him a check for five thousand dollars. With this he procured the tug Yankee, and persuaded Commodore Breese, commandant of the New-York Navy-Yard, to arm and fit her out; and having received from that officer an appointment as Acting Lieutenant in the Navy, I left on the twenty-sixth for Hampton Roads, where I reported to Commodore Pendergrast, of the Cumberland. The services of the Yankee not being required at this point, I proceeded to Annapolis, and offered my vessel to General Butler, who was about opening communications with Washington. The General gratefully received the steamer, and sent me through to the capital to report to the President, and immediately afterward I received an appointment in the Navy Department. Annexed are copies of orders and letters relating to the narrative which I have submitted. Very respectfully yours, G. V. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy. February 8, 1861. Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott, United States Army: sir: The p
the murderous fire with unfaltering determination. Towards the close of the fire, I detached the Second Mississippi and Butler's battery to the extreme right, to open fire on the retreating masses of the enemy, endeavoring to make their way to the covered from them; Lieutenant-Colonel Towers and Lieutenant Harper taken prisoners; Major Magruder seriously wounded; Captain Butler, Lieutenants Montgomery, Williamson, and Blackwell, all wounded; and thirteen men killed, sixty-three wounded, six miergeant Gilmer, while urging his men over the breastworks, and calling upon them to follow their Colonel, and to remember Butler, fell, badly wounded. Also, Color-Corporal Lee, of the Twenty-eighth Virginia, and Captain Jefress, of the Fifty-sixth, utenant J. M. Montgomery, company E, was killed; Lieutenant C. M. Harper, of the same company, was taken prisoner; Captain A. F. Butler, company B, was wounded dangerously; Lieutenant W. W. Williamson, company G, was wounded seriously; and Lieutenant
f his regiment, Major Dale, First Texas, and Major Evans, Eleventh Mississippi, fell whilst leading their brave comrades against ten times their numbers. Colonel Stone, Lieutenant-Colonel Humphreys, and Major Blair, Second Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, Eleventh Mississippi, Captain Scruggs, Fourth Alabama, and Major Webb, Sixth North Carolina. also received severe wounds. Conspicuous were Colonels Law and Wofford, commanding brigades. Lieutenant-Colonel Gary, commanding Hampton leits of human capacity. Our loss, in proportion to the numbers engaged, was extremely heavy. The officers suffered severely. Colonel Liddell, the gallant and beloved commander of the Fourth Mississippi regiment, fell mortally wounded; Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, of the same regiment, received a painful wound, and Major Evans was killed. Colonel Stone, Lieutenant-Colonel Humphries, and Major Blair, of the Second Mississippi, were all wounded, while leading that distinguished regiment in the ch
was then occupied or held by the navy. Information had been received, previous to my arrival at New Orleans, of a contemplated attack for the recovery of that position by the enemy. Upon consultation with Rear Admiral D. G. Farragut and Major-General Butler, both of whom recommended the measure, the Forty-second Massachusetts volunteers, Colonel Burrill commanding, were sent to occupy the island in support of the navy. Brigadier-General A. J. Hamilton, who had been commissioned as military govember, 1863, as General-in-Chief of the army, that this expedition was not contemplated or provided for in General Banks's instructions; but having undoubted information of an immediate attack by the enemy, and of the purpose entertained by General Butler to reinforce the navy by a detachment of land troops, as well as the direct approval of this purpose by Admiral Farragut as commander of the naval forces in the Gulf, it would have been inexcusable, if not criminal, had I declined to maintain
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
y John McLendon. Eighth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. Francis S. Bartow; Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers; Maj. E. J. Magruder; Adjt. J. L. Branch; Commissary George C. Norton; Quartermaster E. A. Wilcox. The captains were E. J. Magruder (A), A. F. Butler (B), H. J. Menard (C), H. E. Malom (D), D. Scott (E), J. T. Lewis (F), T. D. L. Ryan (G), George N. Yarborough (H), George O. Dawson (I), Jacob Phinizy (K). The surgeon was Dr. H. V. M. Miller. This regiment served in the army of Northern Virded as lieutenant-colonel by E. J. Magruder, on whose promotion George O. Dawson became major. The adjutant, J. L. Branch, being killed, was succeeded by A. R. Harper and W. F. Shellman. Among the captains, Magruder was succeeded by S. H. Hall; Butler by J. H. Couper and J. West, and Phinizy by T. J. Bowling. Ninth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. E. R. Goulding; Lieut.-Col. R. A. Turnipseed; Maj. John C. Mounger; Commissary J. C. Waddy; Quartermaster J. W. Sutton; Adjt. A. O. Bacon. The c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
by enemies of the United States in Fort Pulaski and on Cockspur island, Georgia, are hereby confiscated and declared free, in conformity with law, and shall hereafter receive the fruits of their own labor. Such of said persons of color as are able-bodied and may be required shall be employed in the quartermaster's department at the rates heretofore established by Brig.-Gen. T. W. Sherman. This conduct of Hunter accorded with his reputation elsewhere. His brutality was exceeded only by Butler. The above order was followed May 9th by the following: The three States of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against said United States, it became a military necessity to declare martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether i
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
es Barrow (killed), Maj. W. H. Weems, Asst. Quartermaster E. R. Peabody, Adjt. J. A. Byrd; Capts. (A) John K. Redd, (B) T. J. Pritchett, (C) N. W. Garrard, (D) George S. Thomas, (E) C. S. Jenkins, (F) P. Robinson, (G)D. C. Smith, (H) S. A. Townsley, (I) J. T. McClusky. This regiment served in 1863 in the district of Florida, and in February, 1864, participated in the battle of Olustee. It was sent to Virginia in the spring of 1864 and formed part of the force under Beauregard that thwarted Butler's attempt to take Petersburg. It continued to serve in the trenches at Petersburg, being in Mahone's division. At the battle of the Crater, Colonel Evans was killed and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel Weems, who had succeeded James Barrow when he was killed in battle. Capt. C. S. Jenkins thereupon became major. The only other change recorded is that C. A. C. Walker became captain of Company G. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox. The Sixty-fifth regiment Georgia volunteers was
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
e words of Gen. D. R. Jones, with that impetuous valor exhibited on other fields, advanced rapidly on the enemy, facing a hail of grape, canister and musketry, and driving him from his intrenchments to the edge of the Labor-in-Vain swamp. The Eighth led the attack under command of the heroic L. M. Lamar, and suffered severely. Colonel Lamar was wounded and taken by the enemy, Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers and Lieutenant Harper were also captured, Maj. E. J. Magruder was seriously wounded, Captain Butler, Lieutenants Montgomery, Williamson and Blackwell were wounded, and 13 men were killed, 63 wounded, 6 missing and 15 taken prisoners. Of the Seventh, Lieut.-Col. W. W. White, commanding, was seriously wounded, Captain Hicks wounded, and 7 were killed, 60 wounded and 8 missing. On the following day, the 29th (battle of Savage Station), Anderson's Georgia brigade set out in line of battle to find the enemy, traversing his deserted camps and works. The First Georgia regulars, in advance
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
the ranking officer. But upon the secession of Georgia he resigned his commission, and decided to share the fortunes of his native State. He was immediately appointed major-general in the Confederate States army, his commission bearing date May 22, 1861. He commanded at New Orleans during the first part of the war, but was soon compelled to resign on account of age and infirmity. When he left New Orleans he gave his beautiful swords into the keeping of a lady of that city, from whom General Butler, when he took command of the city, seized them, and turned them over to the United States government. They were for years on exhibition in the treasury at Washington, but in 1889 were returned to the Twiggs family. General Twiggs died at Augusta, Ga., September 5, 1862. Major-General William H. T. Walker Major-General William H. T. Walker, one of the most valiant soldiers of the South, achieved fame as a fearless fighter many years before the civil war. He was born in Georgia in
atives abroad, and, taking the company alluded to as a sample of the Georgians generally, so have the people of that patriotic State. They will worthily sustain the honor and renown of a people who, on every battle-field of this country, have always been foremost in the fight. The spirit that animated the gallant Pulaski, (in the shade of whose monument they were formed,) seems to have inspired these intrepid soldiers to do and dare all things for that independence and liberty which they love so well, and without which they do not wish to live. The Oglethorpe Light Infantry, as previously stated, is a very full company. The following are its officers: Francis S. Bartow, Captain; Jos. J. West, 1st Lieutenant; Hamilton Cowper, 2d Lieutenant; A. F. Butler, 3d Lieutenant; J. L. Holcombe, 1st Sergeant; Frederick Bliss, 2d Sergeant; H. A. Crane, 3d Sergeant; W. F. Shellman, 4th Sergeant; and Chas. C. Hardwick, Treasurer. The battalion is now quartered at the Fairfield Race Course.