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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 11: (search)
ure a congressional scandal Logan checkmates Butler death of General Thomas honors to the memorymmendation that Whittemore be expelled. General Ben Butler was a conspicuous figure at this session well as he thought he did. Whittemore went to Butler and begged Butler to defend him on the floor oremarks and the reading of the report when General Butler arose in his place and attempted a defenceittemore. General Logan had been advised that Butler would probably do this, so he quietly hunted u any case before the House. He merely asked Mr. Butler whether he wished to be considered the attorney of Mr. Whittemore. Without hesitation Mr. Butler replied that he did wish to be so considered, atute mentioned, which fell like a pall on General Butler and the whole House and galleries. ButlerButler stammered a disclaimer, explaining that it was a matter of sympathy on his part. General Logan folers of the House has never been equalled. General Butler withdrew from the floor of the House, but [1 more...]
his room, Making it warmer for the gathering gloom, A black man shivering in the winter's cold. Exceeding courage made Ben Butler bold, And to the presence in the dark he said: “What wantest thou?” The figure raised its head, And with a look made of all sad accord Answered: “The men who'll serve the purpose of the Lord.” “And am! one?” said Butler. “Nay, not so,” Replied the black man. Butler spoke more low, But cheerily still, and said: “As I am Ben, You'll not have cause to tell me that agButler spoke more low, But cheerily still, and said: “As I am Ben, You'll not have cause to tell me that again.” The figure bowed and vanished. The next night It came once more, environed strong in light, And showed the names whom love of freedom blessed, And lo! Ben Butler's name led all the rest. As I am Ben, You'll not have cause to tell me that again.” The figure bowed and vanished. The next night It came once more, environed strong in light, And showed the names whom love of freedom blessed, And lo! Ben Butler's
General Butler: a rebel song. Butler and I went out from camp, At Bethel to make battle, And then the Southrons whipt us back, Just like a drove of cattle. Come, throw your swords and muskets down, You do not find them handy, Although the Yankees cannot fight, At running they're the dandy. And then we got a monster gun, Which gButler and I went out from camp, At Bethel to make battle, And then the Southrons whipt us back, Just like a drove of cattle. Come, throw your swords and muskets down, You do not find them handy, Although the Yankees cannot fight, At running they're the dandy. And then we got a monster gun, Which gives us satisfaction, For seven miles are just the space That Yankees like in action. Come, throw your swords, etc. Whenever we go out to fight The Southrons give us lickings, But then we strive to get revenge By stealing all their chickens. Come, throw your swords, etc. Old Butler stays in Fort Monroe, And listens to the firing,s. Come, throw your swords, etc. Old Butler stays in Fort Monroe, And listens to the firing, And when his men have met defeat He then goes out inquiring. Come, throw your swords, etc. To say that Butler will not fight Is certainly no scandal, For not a trophy he has gained Except an old pump-handle, Come, throw your swords, etc.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Colored soldiers at Port Hudson. (search)
listment. He has no sympathy with his former oppressor; he feels an honest pride in being a soldier, and has no desire to return to slavery. Any one can imagine the joy of the colored soldiers, after months of drudgery, building forts, repairing bridges, cleansing sinks for white regiments, carrying baggage for white officers, and all sorts of dirty work, when the command was given for them to leave Baton Rouge and march to Port Hudson. The regiment (the First) broke out in cheers for General Butler and Colonel Stafford, and marched off singing the song, John Brown. The correspondent of the Times has told how these colored soldiers fought on the twenty-seventh, and I need not repeat the story here. The unflinching courage shown on that day has been exhibited nearly every day since, for they have had frequent skirmishes with the rebels, and in every instance the latter have been driven back with loss. Only last week one company of the First regiment charged upon a ridge where th
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, III. (search)
nt. But he brought to its practice a sagacity and a grip of such dimensions as (after some experience) to serve as the equivalents of genius and instruction. This is sometimes cited to point the demagogic moral that education is un-American. Ben Butler in his book says: Grant evidently did not get enough of West Point in him to hurt him any. . . . All the graduates in the higher ranks in their classes never came to anything. Now Robert E. Lee graduated second. It took four years and some half-dozen generals to beat him. But Butler's book would be a joke, were it not a stench. When Grant was near seventeen he told his father that he would never do a day's work at tanning after twenty-one. The sensible Jesse saw no success for him there, if his heart was not in it, and, asking what would he like, was told farming or trading or to get an education. He had no farm to give his son nor money to send him to college, and but a poor opinion of a trader's life on the Mississippi. But
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, IV. (search)
t his constant love of nature leads him to remark and count the strange birds of the country; and he speaks of the beauty of the mountain sides covered with palms which toss to and fro in the wind like plumes in a helmet. This poetical note rings so strangely in the midst of his even, mat. ter-of-fact words that one wonders, did he not hear some one else say it, and adopt it because he thought it good? It was his habit to do this. It is thus that many years later the famous bottling up of Butler came to be so described. Yet, though his heart was not in this war, he shone in its battles. He was in all fights that he could be in, and in several that he need not have been in. For after the capture of Vera Cruz he was appointed regimental quartermaster; and this position puts an officer in charge of the trains, and furnishes him with a valid reason for staying behind with them. Grant never did, however, but was always in the thick of the action. He was commended in reports, brevet
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, V. (search)
a was very naturally heightened by the performances of Generals Butler and Schenck and the rout of Bull Run. In the East thegave in to drink, it seems, at times. Discovering this, Ben Butler appears to have blackmailed him. He had requested ButlerButler's removal for bad conduct at Petersburg. Butler visited him. He backed down. Not from personal fear. The Union cause wasButler visited him. He backed down. Not from personal fear. The Union cause was trembling in politics. A public tale of drink might remove the general, and split the Union forever. Presently Sherman's nd Sheridan's successes clinched Lincoln's election. Next Butler showed incompetence again. Then Grant dismissed him. ButlButler could have published as much about drink as he pleased. The Union was safe. Wound up in this, contemporaneously rather m worthy a high command, and at this time designed him for Butler's successor. But in the same twenty-four hours with ButleButler's blackmail, General Smith criticised to Grant's face the battle of Cold Harbor. Thinking this over, it struck Grant that
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
liberated from this penalty, he charged upon Mercier, giving him the dire alternative of Pay me mer wages, or I'll smash yer crockery! This being disorderly, I allowed him to cool his passions till next morning in the guardhouse, when he was paid off. November 12, 1864 We have the usual play of rumor about cabinets — everybody seems inclined to heave out Stanton: some to heave him up to the Supreme Court--some to heave him down to unknown depths of nothingness. Many would fain fancy Ben Butler in the chair of War, where he would be certain to make things spin either for good or for bad. How he will get on, across the James, I know not. He lost a strong man in Ord, wounded; and in Birney, dead, also: Birney was one who had many enemies, but, in my belief, we had few officers who could command 10,000 men as well as he. He was a pale, Puritanical figure, with a demeanor of unmovable coldness; only he would smile politely when you spoke to him. He was spare in person, with a thin fa
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
that indicted the aldermen, and they found indictments against both the publisher and the editor. The publisher was tried before the same Whig judge and convicted, but when the editor came to be tried upon an article reading as follows:-- Ben Butler. This notorious demagogue and political scoundrel, having swilled three or four extra glasses of liquor, spread himself at whole length in the City Hall last night. . . . The only wonder is that a character so foolish, so grovelling and obscbt that the article was intended for Benjamin F. Butler. He said: You must try it upon the evidence before you. It is not sufficient to read the article. If the name that is given to it corresponds, that is sufficient. The article is headed Ben Butler, and this is the only proof I have heard that it applied to Benjamin F. Butler. If this is sufficient by its application to the complainant, the defendant must be found guilty. I am at a loss to see that there is any evidence upon this point
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 27: administration of President Hayes begins a new era (search)
nd his delight was to stand by the under dog in the fight. In these qualities he was a great and an exceptional man, and his friends valued him and loved him as truly as his foes detested. But was he great always and in everything? Were his thoughts always thoughts of reality, and his utterances and acts always the utterances and acts of wisdom? Who would say so? No man attains to that height, and no man ever scorned the impostures of sham goodness and unattainable perfection more than Ben Butler. He was no pretender and no hypocrite. He lived his life, a life full of energy, of effort, of success, and of failure, and he has passed to the allotted reward; while we who remain may well be grateful to Heaven that such a man has been, Nor farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties from their dread abode, Where they alike in trembling hope repose- The bosom of his Father and his God. It will be noted that while Dana was the youngest of the great New York journalist
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