Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Franklin Butler or search for Benjamin Franklin Butler in all documents.

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Benjamin Franklin Butler. Our readers need no incentive beyond Butler's infamous order to the ladies of New Orleans to make them hate the very name of the detestable scamp; but the subjoined article from the Wilmington Journal lays the lash upon the villain with such a vim that we cannot refrain from copying it: We saw him at the Charleston Convention in May, 1860, and of all that assemblage of sharpers, inside and outside of the Convention, there was no countenance that could approacButler's infamous order to the ladies of New Orleans to make them hate the very name of the detestable scamp; but the subjoined article from the Wilmington Journal lays the lash upon the villain with such a vim that we cannot refrain from copying it: We saw him at the Charleston Convention in May, 1860, and of all that assemblage of sharpers, inside and outside of the Convention, there was no countenance that could approach his in all that makes man hate his race. He seemed to be man only because he could talk. His smile was a scowl; his looks greedy and devouring; his eye like a serpent's, without its charm; his nose mounting the air for prey, his forehead low, skulking, and brutal. Instantly we thought of the line-- "A man may smile and smile, and be a villain still." But seeing the creature could not smile our loathing was turned to pity, to think he was so blasted in the making, and his villainy
unhallowed use Southern farms and Southern wealth. Of such fiendish hell hounds is the army which threatens Richmond composed, impelled by the passions of furies and guided by satanic cunning, they are congregating around it, and like hungry wolves are yelling their fiendish desire to their lust and their avarice on the "beauty and booty" which it contains. To their numbers there is no limit. McClellan can command reinforcements until his wildest ambition is satisfied. The fleets of Butler and Burnside stand ready to do his bidding by sea; while the whole land forces of his despotic master are no doubt held subject to his order. At the lowest estimate, we see nothing to prevent McClellan from assembling an army of three hundred thousand men to assist him in the reduction of the city. We will not speculate on the movements or resources of Gen. Johnston to meet this overwhelming force. It is plain that whatever forces Gen. Johnston may have, McClellan is likely to outnum