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mention. Colonel Magruder, in his official account of the battle, his done this battalion justice; but, as only a few will see this account, I ask, as a simple act of justice, that this be published Colonel Magruder, since the battle, is certain that we were attacked by upwards of five thousand men, and between three and four hundred of the enemy killed and wounded. As a piece of interesting news, of which you have not yet, I believe, become possessed, I will mention that, on the 12th, Captain Davis, Lieutenant Lea, and Dr. Martin, of the New York Firemen Zouaves, came with a flag of truce from General Butler to our out-post, to treat with Colonel Magruder in relation to their dead, wounded, and prisoners. The result of the interview has not transpired, except that one of their prisoners was exchanged for one of ours. It is said by military men that this is a positive recognition of us, as a belligerent power, and will be so regarded by the nations of Europe. A Participant.
The oath. --Butler compels every one, who happens to get within the walls of Fortress Monroe, to take an oath of "true faith and allegiance to the United States of America." --Two gentlemen of Baltimore, who were in the neighborhood on a fishing excursion, were seized by a party of soldiers, sent after them by General Butler, and after being treated with every insolence and indignity because they refused to sign a most outrageous instrument tendered them, were sent to the guardhouse. Theye an oath of "true faith and allegiance to the United States of America." --Two gentlemen of Baltimore, who were in the neighborhood on a fishing excursion, were seized by a party of soldiers, sent after them by General Butler, and after being treated with every insolence and indignity because they refused to sign a most outrageous instrument tendered them, were sent to the guardhouse. They finally consented to sign, "under compulsion and with a mental reservation," as they distinctly stated.
the 10th of June, together with newspaper comments thereon, showing to some extent the impression produced, by the overwhelming defeat, upon the public mind in that section. While much of it is untrue, enough is apparent to show that they begin to have some idea of Southern bravery and prowess. We commence one narration with accounts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, be
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], [from another correspondent of the Sun.] (search)
he Federal troops. The first intelligence of the result of the battle from General Butler put down the number of killed at twenty-five, and the wounded at one hundre. The following account of the repulse was revised and corrected by Major General Butler for the Associated Press: Fortress Monroe, June 10. --This has been an exciting and sorrowful day at Old Point Comfort. General Butler having learned that the Confederates were forming an entrenched camp, with strong battering, fired upon Col. Townsend's column, marching in close order, and led by Lieut. Butler, with two pieces of artillery. Other accounts say that Col. Townsend's regning. There are probably twenty-five killed and one hundred wounded. Lieut. Col. Butler deserves the greateste credit for bringing off the killed and wounded. S. Considerable indignation is manifested against Brig Gen. Pierce. General Butler has been ubiquitous, doing all in his power to save the men and for the hon
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], Generals Pierce and Bombastes Furioso Butler. (search)
Generals Pierce and Bombastes Furioso Butler. --The Washington correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer telegraphs to that paper: At the War Department the utmost regret is expressed at the repulse to our arms, and the disastrous result of the mistake between the two New York regiments. At present all severely condemn the course of Brigadier General Pierce in uselessly exposing his rear to such a galling fire, and it is probable that that officer will meet with severe censure. ous result of the mistake between the two New York regiments. At present all severely condemn the course of Brigadier General Pierce in uselessly exposing his rear to such a galling fire, and it is probable that that officer will meet with severe censure. The special messenger that arrived here to-day from Fortress Monroe, reports that when General Butler heard of the affair at Great Bethel, he exclaimed, "I will have all those rebel batteries before I eat my breakfast tomorrow morning"
een accepted, on the condition that they report for duty at Harrisburg within ten days. The improbable rumor that Gen. Butler had renewed the battle at Great Bethel with great results caused an intense excitement throughout the city to day. Lieut. Butler to-day brought the official dispatches of the actual engagement under Gen. Pierce. They no not essentially vary from the published accounts. It is therein stated that of the fourteen Federals killed, eight fell by the hands of thei Keys will, there is little if any doubt, be appointed a Brigadier General in the army. A bearer of dispatches to Gen. Butler left Washington to-day. Col. Stone's column has been heard from this morning, but there is nothing to indicate thpect to recent and intended military operations in that vicinity, are anxiously awaited here. It is not supposed that Gen. Butler will remain inactive. No official account of the affair of Monday has been received, and the current reports of it ar
ace of James E. Harvey, recalled. Ninety more of Bartlett's brigade arrived at New York from Fortress Monroe on Monday. There are four hundred and fifty remaining there. It is rumored that Lincoln's Cabinet have decided to instruct General Butler not to receive any more fugitive slaves into Fortress Monroe. We don't believe it. During the week ending June 8th, there were enlisted at New York for the army 28 men, and for the navy 239. Martin A. Conway, the Abolitionist, has s resignation. A house in New York on Monday, received a remittance of $1,500 from a debtor in Charleston. The fruit crop in New England; according to accounts from various quarters, will be small this year. It is reported that General Butler has directed John La Mountain to repair to Fortress Monroe with his balloons and apparatus The "Union" gun has been raised from the bottom of the river at Baltimore, and placed on a vessel for shipment to Fortress Monroe. On Monday
sent another letter, desiring her to pay him a visit at that place, and enclosed her a pass for the purpose. This she also refused, very correctly surmising that once in the clutches of the "Northern barbarian" she would not be able to return. It is reported by those who cross this rubicon, that the treatment they receive at the hands of the Federal Officers, if not polite, is at least not positively offensive, contrasting strongly with the course pursued towards passengers by Bombastes Furioso Butler. To prevent the conveyance of news, both ladies and gentlemen are required to give up all newspapers, (though many surreptitiously find their way through to Norfolk and Richmond,) the ladies being examined by one of their own sex, and the gentlemen by an official appointed for the purpose. Where these parties are detained for three or four days, they are "colonized" in residences outside of the Fortress, and a watch is kept up on their movements. If, however, a lady happens to be
an must come to the conclusion that naval expeditions "don't pay." The first grand enterprise of the sort, under Bombastes Furioso Butler, was the capture of Hatteras; but nothing came of the possession of that sandbank, and the sea has now risen up and driven off the captors. It is no discredit to Cape Hatteras that it encumbered to General Butler. Even that region of eternal storms was no match for such a windbag. But Neptune has risen up and vindicated the honor of his boundaries, ejectingceremonious manner, and sprinkling salt enough on the shore to purify it from the defilement of their occupation. As General Butler has conquered Hatteras, he is now trying his hand at New Orleans and Mobile; but in that tropical region they are accustomed to more powerful wind instruments than Butler, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, so that we doubt whether any more walls will fall at the blowing of his ram's born. Sherman's expedition, which was so vauntingly heralded by the Northern press