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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
and contained about twenty-four patients. The attacking party did not spare or respect this building. They were met by the Montgomery Guards, Capt. Gleeson, who made a brave resistance, but were driven back with the loss of twenty-five of their men killed and wounded. Capt. Gleeson was shot through the jaw and badly wounded. The gallant Montgomery made many of the Texans bite the dust. This fight was very fierce. Some of the sick were actually bayoneted or sabred in their cots. Rev. Father Butler, an esteemed Catholic clergyman of this city, and the chaplain of the Irish Brigade, was wounded in the forehead by a ball which passed across it, laying open the skin. He was taken prisoner, as also was Dr. Winer, surgeon of the brigade, thus depriving the regiment of the valuable services of both, during the dark and trying days that followed, preceding the surrender. The issue of the 12th, warned the enemy that they had a task before them which was no easy one, and they commence
contained about twenty-four patients. The attacking party did not spare or respect this building. They were met by the Montgomery Guard; Captain Gleeson, who made a brave resistance, but were driven back, with the loss of twenty-five of their men killed and wounded. Captain Gleeson was shot through the jaw and badly wounded. The gallant Montgomery made many of the Texans bite the dust. This fight was very fierce. Some of the sick were actually bayonetted or sabred in their cots. Rev. Father Butler, an esteemed Catholic clergyman of this city, and the Chaplain of the Irish brigade, was wounded in the forehead by a ball which passed across it, laying open the skin. He was taken prisoner, as was also Dr. Winer, Surgeon of the brigade, thus depriving the regiment of the valuable services of both during the dark and trying days that followed preceding the surrender. The issue of the 12th warned the enemy that they had a task before them which was no easy one, and they commenced