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A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 7 1 Browse Search
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mrades availed themselves, to write home. There was a musical tribute rendered by a chorus of our comrades while waiting for the train, in appreciation of the attentions of the ladies; then adieus, and departure for Washington; through Wilmington before noon, and on to the bank of the Susquehanna. There, awaiting our train, was the huge railroad ferry-boat, the Constitution, the bridge from Port Deposit to Havre de Grace having been burned; this was said to be the vessel that conveyed Gen. Butler and his command to Annapolis when he took possession of that city in the previous spring. It was a a novel sight, the transportation of a train of freight and passenger cars with locomotive over the ferry. Late in the afternoon we arrived at the Baltimore station of this road, and thence marched across the city to the station from which we were to proceed to Washington. In the evening we found ourselves ensconced in freight cars, and entered upon our forty-mile ride to the capital.
ade.—Brig. Gen. C. E. Pratt, Commanding, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 6th Maine, 43d New York, 119th Pennsylvania. Second Brigade.—Col. Henry Whiting, Commanding, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont, and 26th New Jersey. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Francis L. Vinton, Commanding, 20th, 33d, 49th, and 77th New York, and 21st New Jersey Volunteers. Artillery. Ayres's F, 5th United States; Snow's B, 1st Maryland; Cowan's 1st New York Battery; Stewart's 3d New York. Third Division. Brig. Gen. John Newton, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Cochrane, Commanding, 23d, 61st, and 82d Pennsylvania, 65th, 67th, and 122d New York Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Chas. Devens, Commanding, 7th, 10th, and 37th Massachusetts, 2d Rhode Island, and 36th New York Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Col. T. A. Rowley, Commanding, 62d New York, 93d, 98th, 102d, and 139th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Artillery. Butler's G, 2d United States; McCarthy's C, 1st Pe
rigade.—Col. H. L. Eustis, Commanding. 7th Massachusetts, Lieut. Col. F. P. Harlow; 10th Massachusetts, Lieut. Col. J. M. Decker; 37th Massachusetts, Col. T. Ingraham; 2d Rhode Island, Lieut. Col. A. W. Corliss. Third Brigade.—Col. David Nevin, Commanding. 62d New York, Lieut. Col. T. B. Hamilton; 102d Pennsylvania, Col. J. W. Patterson; 93d Pennsylvania, Col. J. M. McCarter; 98th Pennsylvania, Maj. J. B. Kohler; 139th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. W. H. Moody. Artillery Brigade. Col. Chas. H. Tompkins, Commanding. Battery A, 1st Massachusetts, Capt. Wm. H. McCartney; Battery D, 2d United States, Lieut. E. B. Williston; Battery F, 5th United States, Lieut. Leonard Martin; Battery G, 2d United States, Lieut. G. H. Butler; Battery C, 1st Rhode Island, Capt. Richard Waterman; Battery G, 1st Rhode Island, Capt. G. W. Adams; 1st New York, Capt. Andrew Cowan; 3d New York, Capt. Wm. A. Harn. Cavalry Detachment. Capt. Wm. L. Craft, Commanding. H, 1st Pennsylvania; L, 1st New Jers
y evinced great interest in military affairs, becoming in 1852 a member of the Boston Light Artillery. In 1861, when the Massachusetts militia was called to the defence of the capital, Porter was first lieutenant of the Light Artillery Corps, with which he had early connected himself; he accompanied that command as its second officer, and served with honor during the term of enlistment of his company. The scene of its-operations was central Maryland, being in the department commanded by Gen. Butler. Lieut. Porter, whose urbanity made him ever popular with officers and men, seems to have been a local authority as a tactician, when the battery first entered the service, and this fact, doubtless, had due influence in causing his selection for the command of the First Massachusetts Light Battery. Capt. Porter evinced great executive ability in the arduous work of recruiting, mustering, equipping, and instructing his command, and the condition and appearance of the corps at the moment of