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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 12 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 3 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
y, we must say, It is immoral, it is unclean, it is an offence against the Divine Law, and therefore it must be put down. (Applause.) I am very sorry indeed that one to whom reference has been made this afternoon, is not here—I mean Mrs. Josephine Butler. I have, on the other side of the Atlantic, felt the force of her moral magnetism, and the uplifting power of her influence, and I have desired for a long time to be able to see her, to make her personal acquaintance. I cannot express tst wind and tide. Living and dying I will give my support to such, and look to God for His blessing in the end. The effect produced by this little speech, delivered, as the report betrays, without premeditation, was wonderfully inspiring. Mr. Butler would tell you of the pleasant meeting we had on Friday afternoon. He could not tell you how much we missed you and longed for you amongst us. But he could say what a grand speech we had from Mr. Garrison, so sympathetic and encouraging that it
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
mber was spent in Switzerland. Chamounix filled the travellers with delight. They walked up the Brevant, rode to the Mer de Glace on muleback. The great feature, however, of this visit to Switzerland was the Geneva Congress, called by Mrs. Josephine Butler to protest against the legalizing of vice in England. At the Congress to-day — spoke in French.... I spoke of the two sides, active and passive, of human nature, and of the tendency of the education given to women to exaggerate the pashusband not, wife superior. Each indispensable to each other, and to the whole. Gentlemen, where would you have been if we had not cradled and tended you? Congress.... Just before the end of the meeting Mr. Stuart came to me and said that Mrs. Butler wished me to speak for five minutes. After some hesitation I said that I would try. Felt much annoyed at being asked so late. Went up to the platform and did pretty well in French. The audience applauded, laughing a little at some points.
Bruce, Mrs. E. M., I, 389, 391. Bruges, I, 280. Brummel, G. B., I, 316. Brussels, I, 279. Bryant, W. C., I, 209, 304; II, 197, 198. Bryce, James, II, 168. Buck, Florence, I, 391. Buffalo, I, 376; II, 90, 139. Buller, Charles, I, 82. Bullock, A. H., I, 249. Bulwer-Lytton, E., I, 262; II, 206. Burne-Jones, Mrs. E., II, 169. Burns, Robert, I, 139. Burr, Mrs., II, 130. Burt, Mr., II, 248. Busoni, Sig., II, 192. Butcher, S. H., II, 323. Butler, Josephine, II, 21. Butler, W. A., II, 248, 306. Butterworth, Hezekiah, II, 228, 270. Byron, G. Gordon, Lord, I, 68; II, 296. Cable, G. W., II, 87. Cabot, Elliot, II, 363. Caine, Hall, II, 243, 248, 250. Cairo, II, 34, 35, 36, 182. California, II, 131, 135, 154. Calypso, I, 272. Cambridge Club, II, 66. Campagna, I, 95, 134. Campanari, Sig., II, 270. Campbell, Dudley, II, 8. Campello, Count Salome di, II, 273, 285, 302. Cardini, Sig., I, 43, 44. Cari
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 15: a woman's peace crusade (search)
ping by my personal presence to effect the holding of a Woman's Peace Congress in the great metropolis of the civilized world. In Liverpool, I called upon Mrs. Josephine Butler, whose labors in behalf of her sex were already well known in America. Mrs. Butler said to me, Mrs. Howe, you have come at a fortunate moment. The cruel Mrs. Butler said to me, Mrs. Howe, you have come at a fortunate moment. The cruel immorality of our army regulations, separating so great a number of our men from family life, is much in the public mind just at present. This is a good time in which to present the merits and the bearings of peace. Mrs. Butler suggested that I might easily find opportunities of speaking in various parts of England, and added soMrs. Butler suggested that I might easily find opportunities of speaking in various parts of England, and added some names to the list of friends of peace with which I had already provided myself. Among these were Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Winkworth, whose hospitality I enjoyed for some days, on my way to London. This couple belonged to the society of Friends, but had much to say about the theistic movement in the society. In London Mrs. Winkwor
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 17: the woman suffrage movement (search)
n's Department. In this work I received valuable aid from Mrs. Henrietta L. T. Wolcott, who, in the capacity of treasurer, was able to exercise a constant supervision over the articles consigned to our care. On the opening day of the fair General Butler, who was then governor of Massachusetts, presided. In introducing me, he said, in a playfully apologetic manner, Mrs. Howe may say some things which we might not wish to hear, but it is my office to present her to this audience. He probably thought that I was about to speak of woman suffrage. My address, however, did not touch upon that topic, but upon the present new departure, its value and interest. General Butler, indeed, sometimes claimed to be a friend of woman suffrage, but one of our number said of him in homely phrase: He only wants to have his dish right side up when it rains. The most noticeable points in our exhibit were, first, the number of useful articles invented by women; secondly, a very creditable exhibiti
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 20: friends and worthies: social successes (search)
rk, in the Columbian year, so called. I have been the founder of a club of young girls, which has exercised a salutary influence upon the growing womanhood of my adopted city, and has won for itself an honorable place in the community, serving also as a model for similar associations in other cities. I have been for many years the president of the New England Woman's Club, and of the Association for the Advancement of Women. I have been heard at the great Prison Congress in England, at Mrs. Butler's convention de moralite publique in Geneva, Switzerland, and at more than one convention in Paris. I have been welcomed in Faneuil Hall, when I have stood there to rehearse the merits of public men, and later, to plead the cause of oppressed Greece and murdered Armenia. I have written one poem which, although composed in the stress and strain of the civil war, is now sung South and North by the champions of a free government. I have been accounted worthy to listen and to speak at the
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
he Evening Post, 21; visitor at the Ward home, 79; celebration of his seventieth birthday, 277-280; at the meetings for promoting the woman's peace crusade, 329; admires the sermon of Athanase Coquerel at Newport, 342. Bull Run, second battle of, 258. Buller, Charles, his appreciation of Carlyle, 110. Bunsen, Chevalier, Prussian ambassador to England, 118. Bums, Anthony, 164. Butler, Benjamin F., disinterestedness of his friendship for woman suffrage questioned, 395. Butler, Mrs., Josephine, encourages the woman's peace congress idea, 329. Byron, Lord, at Harrow, 22; his works unwillingly allowed in the Ward family, 58; his example leads Dr. Howe to Greece, 85; autograph letter of, 100; praise of, unpardonable in London, 115. Cardini, Signor, Mrs. Howe's instructor in vocal music, 16; his anecdote of the Duke of Wellington, 17. Carlisle, Earl of, dinner given by, 106. Carlisle, Countess of, dinner given by, 106; her good nature: pleasantry about, 107. Ca