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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
22, 1864 Stettin.   Sugar, 14 bbls., etc. 1,176 07 205 60 970 47 New Orleans July 19, 1864 Cayuga, Owasco. Steamer Southern Merchant 3,000 00 481 30 2,518 70 do Oct. 2, 1865 Diana.   Shoes, 498 pairs $80.13 1/2 paid as salvage to Samuel Butler. Prize list of Genesee waiting. 273 90 $80.13 1/2 paid as salvage to Samuel Butler. Prize list of Genesee waiting.80 13 1/2 80 131/<*> do   Genesee. 113 63 Schooner Segur $1,321.07 1/2 paid to James Taylor for raising and repaiSamuel Butler. Prize list of Genesee waiting.80 13 1/2 80 131/<*> do   Genesee. 113 63 Schooner Segur $1,321.07 1/2 paid to James Taylor for raising and repairing vessel — Decreed to West Gulf squadron informal. 3,150 00 $1,321.07 1/2 paid to James Taylor for raising and repairing vessel — Decreed to West Gulf squadron informal.1,321 07 1/2 1,321 07 1/2 do   Gulf squadron. 507 85   Sundries, 12 boxes 816 03 196 98 619 05 Key West Mar. 29, 1864 Brooklyn. Schooner Stingray 33,988 04 2,968 16 31,019 88 New Orleans June 7, 1864 Penobscot. Schooner Sylphide 3,050 69 769 95 2,280 74 do June 17, 1864 Virginia. Steamer Scotia 76,448 52
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
manner of The Spectator just ten years after the first appearance of The Spectator in London. How novel the whole method would be to New England readers may be inferred from the fact that even the Harvard library had no copies of Addison or Steele at this period. Swift, Pope, Prior, and Dryden would also have been looked for in vain. Milton himself was little known in the stronghold of Puritanism. But the printing office of James Franklin had Shakespeare, Milton, Addison, Steele, Cowley, Butler's Hudibras, and The Tail of the Tub The spelling of the Courant. on its shelves. All these were read and used in the editor's office, but The Spectator and its kind became the actual model for the new journalism. As a result, the very look of an ordinary first page of the Courant is like that of a Spectator page. After the more formal introductory paper on some general topic, such as zeal or hypocrisy or honour or contentment, the facetious letters of imaginary correspondents commo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
r the whigs. The meeting breaks up at the approach of the whigs and McFingal deserts his followers and escapes to the British. The verse runs swiftly, with considerable comic force, and contains epigrammatic couplets that might have come from Hudibras: No man e'er felt the halter draw, With good opinion of the law, and But optics sharp it needs, I ween, To see what is not to be seen. The burlesque contrasts, the absurd figures of speech, the far-fetched allusions, are learned from Butler; and the verse, with its frequent elisions, its feminine rhymes, and its homely diction, is more nearly that of Hudibras than of any other satire. Churchill is responsible for such serious passages in the speeches as For ages blest thus Britain rose The terror of encircling foes; Her heroes ruled the bloody plain; Her conq'ring standard aw'd the main, as also for the use of personifications and of the terrible: Around all stained with rebel blood, Like Milton's lazar house it stood, Where g
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
iction was severe, simple, chaste, narrower in range than that of his political prose; that his rhymes were dignified, sonorous, exact and emphatic rather than subtle or allusive, and narrow in range — not from artistic poverty but because the rhyme vocabulary of the simple and serious moods is in English itself narrow, and much novelty and variety of rhyme is in our speech possible only when, like Browning, one portrays the grotesque and the eccentric, or like Shelley the fantastic, or like Butler the comic, or like Chaucer the familiar. Such a mind would deduce Bryant's most fundamental rhythm, the iambic; his most fundamental metre, the pentameter; together with his preference for stanzaic, or periodic, treatment, whether in blank verse or in rhyme, rather than for couplets; yes, together with the most characteristic cadences,--like the curves of a distant mountain range, few and clear but not monotonous; like the waves of a broad river, slow and long but not hesitant or ponderous,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce, Oliver, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144 Burk, 192 Burk, John, 224, 226 Burke, Charles, 231 Burke, Edmund, 91, 99, 141, 200, 212, 277 Burnaby, Rev., Andrew, 205, 206 Burnett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byronism in America, 280 n. C Caius Marius, 222 Calavar, 319 Calaynos, 222, 223 n. Caleb Williams, 288, 290 Calef, Robert, 55 Calvert, Sir, George, 4 Calvin, 36, 39, 66, 67, 71, 83 Campaign, 159 Campbell, George, 229 Campbell, Thomas, 183, 282 Candid examination of the neutral claims of great Bri