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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 2 Browse Search
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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ssippi to New Orleans. If it should in any contingency become necessary, can you lend a hand to Butler? Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Major-General Halleck, Corinth. Corinth, Miss., eek. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jeff. C. Davis, Commanding Division. Maj. S. Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 26.-report of Brig. Gen. Gordon Granger, U. S. Army, coy, your obedient servant, D. S. Stanley, Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Division. Maj. S. Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Mississippi. No. 41.-report of Col. Washington lliams and the batteries of Hescock and Houghtaling. By order of Major-General Pope: speed Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 45.-report of Lieut. Col. John Tillson, Tenth Illinois the bridges were fired) as the enemy approached precluded pursuit, but without much delay Lieutenant Butler, of the Louisiana regulars, effected a crossing, with a small detail, and completed the de
6 miles from its mouth. I reached Celina at 4 o'clock on Monday afternoon, and ordered three companies to charge into the town, while I held the remaining six companies in reserve to cut off the retreat of the rebels to the hills. Hamilton had received notice of our approach thirty minutes before, and with his band had scattered among the hills and rocks in places inaccessible to mounted troops. I, however, succeeded in capturing 4 of his men, who gave their names Samuel Granville, Smith Butler, Tipton T. C. Settle, and William Henry Harrison Peterman. Against the last of these there is an indictment in Monroe County for murder. He has been the dread of the whole neighborhood, and next to Hamilton is the most important and dangerous man in that region. The others are very bad men, and were recognized as active men of Hamilton's band through the whole route to this place. There were no men in Celina except those we captured, and they made desperate attempts to escape. I o