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e riot at Baltimore, 464; his dispatch to Bradley T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See JoKillinger, Mr., in American Convention. 247. King, Rufus, remarks in Convention, 42. King, Thomas Butler, goes to California, 201. King, Wm. R., Minister to Paris; is instructed by Calhoun asn, 107; 142; withdraws from the Douglas Convention, 318; 849; population in 1860, 351; 461; 468; Butler lands at Annapolis, 468-9; Legislature convenes at Frederick, 470; decides not to secede, etc., New Orleans The, on Black Republicans, 437. New Orleans Picayune, The, quotation from, Gen. Butler's pedigree, etc., 508; its construction of Lincoln's Indianapolis speech, 510. New Orleans, Lieut.-Col., at Ball's Bluff, 623. Witherspoon, Rev. T. S., 128. Wool, Gen., succeeds Gen. Butler, 531. Wood, Col. A. M., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Woodward, Judge Geo. W., speech at t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Thomas, 1754-1805 (search)
Butler, Thomas, 1754-1805 Military officer: born in Pennsylvania in 1754; was in almost every important battle in the Middle States during the Revolution. At Brandy-wine and at Monmouth he received the thanks of his commanders (Washington and Wayne) for skill and bravery. In 1791 he commanded a battalion under St. Clair, and was twice wounded at the defeat of that leader, where his brother Richard was killed. He died in New Orleans Sept. 7, 1805.
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company D. (search)
. Disch. July 14, 1865 as Corp. William E. Brown. South Boston, 28, m; carpenter. Aug. 14, 1862. Disch. for promotion, Aug. 14, 1863. 1st Lieut. 1st Regt.. Louisiana Cav Killed in action, Sabine Cross Roads, La. April , 1864. William H. Bryant, New Bedford, 18, s; laborer. Jan. 2, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. John Burke, West Roxbury, 39, m laborer. Sept. 13, 1862. Died Sept. 18, 1863. Michael Burns, Taunton. 36, m; painter. Jan. 5, 1864. Disch. disa Jan. 8. 1865. Thomas Butler, Boston, 40, m porter, Aug. 15, 1862. Disch. disa. March 22, 1864. William Buttinger, Boston, 29, m; cabinet maker. Aug. 15, 1862. Trans. to Co. I, 3rd Regt. V. R.C. April 30, 1864. Disch. July 14, 1865 as Corp. Unof. Hugh Byrne, Boston, 31, s; trader. Aug. 29, 1862. Disch. disa Nov. 5, 1863. John T. Carnes, Boston, 27. s; machinist. Aug. 15, 1862. Deserted Dec. 2, 1862. Long Island, N. Y. Asa Caswell, Natick, 43, m; carpenter. Jan. 2, 1861. Trans. to Co. C, 14th Re
Stealing money. --Samuel W. Davis alleges that Thomas Butler took fifty dollars from him in a surreptitious manner. Butler appeared before the Mayor yesterday of his own accord. The complainant was not present. The case was continued until to-day, and the defendant was allowed to go under a guaranty that he would be present when wanted. Stealing money. --Samuel W. Davis alleges that Thomas Butler took fifty dollars from him in a surreptitious manner. Butler appeared before the Mayor yesterday of his own accord. The complainant was not present. The case was continued until to-day, and the defendant was allowed to go under a guaranty that he would be present when wanted.
more was greeted with cheers for Jeff, Davis. The correspondent of the Tribune says that Colonel Allen, of the New York 1st Regiment has been arrested by General Butler. Butler's loyalty is strongly suspected. The regular officers are preparing to petition for his removal. The New York Regiment, both regulars and volunteer correspondent of the Tribune says that Colonel Allen, of the New York 1st Regiment has been arrested by General Butler. Butler's loyalty is strongly suspected. The regular officers are preparing to petition for his removal. The New York Regiment, both regulars and volunteers, decline an attack in battle under General Butler. correspondent of the Tribune says that Colonel Allen, of the New York 1st Regiment has been arrested by General Butler. Butler's loyalty is strongly suspected. The regular officers are preparing to petition for his removal. The New York Regiment, both regulars and volunteers, decline an attack in battle under General Butler.
Acquitted. --Thomas Butler, who was charged with stealing $50 from Samuel W. Davis, underwent an examination before the Mayor yesterday, and was acquitted. It appeared from the evidence, (if we rightly understood it,) that the amount was partnership funds, which he had the legal right to receive.
o Confederate pickets were captured on Saturday night, and brought into Fortress Monroe. Gen. Butler had ordered two regiments to Hampton, where they were throwing up entrenchments. The bat Later.--June 30, 6 P. M.--I have just returned from Newport News, with a party accompanying Gen. Butler, and consisting of Col. Dimmick, Thurlow Weed, Dr. Lieber, Col. Taylor of Washington, Senator Wilson, Hon. H. J. Raymond, R. C. McCormick, Lieut. Butler, Mr. Carnegis, and others. A grand review was intended, but the rain prevented. Three shots were fired from Sawyer's rified gun, the ached the opposite bank of James River, 4½ miles distant. Arrest of Col. Allen--rumor of Gen. Butler's removal. We give the following particulars from the correspondence of the Philadelphia uts, were destroyed. This morning Col. Allen was surprised to receive the following from Gen. Butler's headquarters: Headquarters Dep't of Virginia,Fortress Monroe,June 28, 1861. Specia
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], The manufacture of American salt in case of war. (search)
eir respective families, and to dispose of the same in small quantities at the same rate. And that the said Commissioners do also purchase all the salt which maybe imported within six months. "That Colonel Laurens, Mr Ferguson, the Rev. Mr. Tennent, Mr. Edwards and Mr.Gibbes, be and they are hereby, appointed Commissioners to erect and superintend a Public Salt Works at or near Charlestown; that Mr. Joseph Allston, Captain William Allston, Mr. Benjamin Young, Mr. Peter Simons and Mr. Thomas Butler, be and they are in like manner appointed Commissioners for a public Salt Works on the Northern coast; and that Captain Thomas Tucker, Mr. Daniel Jenkins, Mr. Jos. Fickling, be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners in like manner for a public Salt Works on the Southern coast of this colony. That each board of the said Commissioners, respectively, shall have power to draw upon the colony treasury, for any sum not exceeding $35,000 (seven thousand pounds currency) for defraying t
to specie. The Herald, however, tells us that if the blockade should be continued until the coming in of the next year's crop, the operation would saddle the Government with a debt of $225,000,000, which would be a most disastrous affair. There is no possibility that it will continue so long, far less that "Fremont, with a hundred thousand men, should descend the Mississippi and capture New Orleans" and Mobile with all the cotton those cities contain, or that "some General of capacity (not Butler) should advance with a hundred thousand troops and seize all the cotton in South Carolina and Georgia." It is ludicrous to hear the advocates of Lincoln talk so magniloquently three, weeks after the rout at Bull Run. Nevertheless, Bennett has convinced himself that the Confederate States cannot "raise the wind." On the other hand, he is convinced that the Yankee Government can command any amount of cash in Europe. English financiers, he says, are very glad to get American securities.
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], Hospital supplies for the Army of the Northwest. (search)
firmation of the views of the British press will be found in the details of that appalling Federal defeat, which went out on the Wednesday after the battle; nor is it unreasonable to expect that so thorough and masterly a triumph will so far evidence the ability of the Confederates to hold its own, so perceptibly to hasten its inevitable recognition. Cost and Consequences of the war. A Philadelphia correspondent of the Baltimore Exchange takes the following view of things: Gen. Butler, with 20,000 or 30,000 men and a fleet, was sent to take possession of Norfolk in a week. So certain were the public that he would succeed, that we hourly expected the news of its capture. Three months finds him still in Fortress Monroe, having accomplished nothing but the disastrous affair at Bethel.--Two hundred and forty thousand men were called for — the same authorities told us the work would now be "sharp and short; " the over powering force would crush out the rebellion in no tim