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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
lves with as much forbearance and propriety as if they were at their own homes. They are here to fight the enemies of the country, not to judge and punish the unarmed and helpless, however guilty they may be. When necessary, that will be done by the proper person. By command of General McDowell. Jas. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General. This order deserves to be exhumed from the oblivion into which it seems to have fallen, and is in strong contrast with the subsequent practice under Butler, Pope, Milroy, Hunter, Sheridan, Sherman, etc. This war order of McDowell's might well have been commended to the consideration of military satraps set, to rule over the people of the South in a time of peace. It did not prevent the burning of the entire village of Germantown, a few miles from Fairfax Court-House, but the citizens agreed that McDowell had made an honest effort to prevent depredations by his troops; and it gives me pleasure to make the statement, as it is the last time I wil
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 26: treatment of prisoners, wounded and dead. (search)
to be expected that we would turn those men loose to come back again to kill and plunder our people? Kindred to this is another charge of plundering and disfiguring the dead. Now as to the question of plundering, I cannot but think that it is more cruel to plunder the living than the dead, especially if the living be helpless women and children. I presume it is not necessary to state the reasons why I entertain this opinion. It is to me a little strange that the men who applauded Butler, Banks, Milroy, Sherman, and Sheridan, for plundering and rendering utterly desolate the houses of thousands of woman and children, should complain that our barefooted soldiers took the shoes from the feet of some of the men who had been engaged in this plunder and were killed in order that they might not be able to follow and fight the rest. I have myself but too often seen in the track of the Federal armies the evidence of how they plundered and destroyed the property of our people. N
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
middle of March, and assumed command, finding it in its old position, nothing serious having occurred during the winter. What was left of Hoke's brigade had been detached and sent under General Hoke to North Carolina, where it participated in some movements, including the capture of the town of Plymouth, with its garrison, by Hoke. It did not return to the division until after the commencement of the subsequent campaign, though it took part in the defence of Petersburg and the attack on Butler by General Beauregard. We remained in position in our old place until the opening of the spring campaign. In the meantime Major General U. S. Grant had been assigned to the command of all the armies of the United States, with the rank of Lieutenant General, and had come to take immediate command of the army confronting us, which army was being very greatly strengthened by recruits, drafted men, and other troops. The Army of the Potomac under Meade had been consolidated into three co
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 31: from the Rapidan to the James. (search)
le Department, 47,751 available men for duty, the chief part of which, he says, was called to the front, after the campaign began, in order to repair the losses of the Army of the Potomac; and Grant says that, at Spottsylvania Court-House, the 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th (of May) were consumed in manoeuvring and awaiting the arrival of reinforcements from Washington. His army, therefore, must have numbered very nearly, if not quite, 200,000 men, before a junction was effected with Butler. On the 4th of May, it was discovered that Grant's army was moving towards Germana Ford on the Rapidan, which was ten or twelve miles from our right. This movement had begun on the night of the 3rd, and the enemy succeeded in seizing the ford and effecting a crossing, as the river was guarded at that point by only a small cavalry picket. The direct road from Germana Ford to Richmond passes by Spottsylvania Court-House and when Grant had effected his crossing, he was nearer to Richmond
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 35: battles of Cold Harbor. (search)
, with the 2nd corps, to the Shenandoah Valley to meet Hunter. This, therefore, closed my connection with the campaign from the Rapidan to James River. When I moved on the morning of the 13th, Grant had already put his army in motion to join Butler, on James River, a position which he could have reached, from his camp on the north of the Rapidan, by railroad transports, without the loss of a man. In attempting to force his way by land, he had already lost, in killed and wounded, more men tver Junction, says: But the enemy again having the shorter line, and being in possession of the main roads, was enabled to reach the North Anna in advance of us, and took position behind it. And, when he speaks of his final determination to join Butler, he says: After the battle of the Wilderness it was evident that the enemy deemed it of the first importance to run no risk with the army he then had. He acted purely on the defensive, behind breastworks, or, feebly, on the offensive, immediately
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
266 Buford's Depot, 377 Buford's Gap, 377 Bull Mountain, 114 Bull Pasture River, 326 Bull Run, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 37, 39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58, 118, 119, 127, 128, 129, 306 Bunker Hill, 163, 284, 400, 402, 403, 406, 408, 410, 411, 413, 419, 420 Burke's Station, 50 Burnside, General (U. S. A.), 104, 1.05, 106, 131, 132, 150, 151, 158, 165, 166, 169, 180, 189, 192, 341, 343, 348, 356, 358, 477 Burton's Mill, 242 Butler, General (U. S. A.), 40, 341, 344, 364 Butterfield (U. S. A.), 218 Cabell, General, 198, 210 Calf Pasture River, 326 Callahan's, 327, 330 Callaway, Lieutenant, Wm. G., 187, 209, 250, 464 Camden, 184 Cameron's Depot, 408 Campbell Court-House, 376 Camp Walker, 6, 12 Canada, 472 Capital, 90, 159, 160 Carlisle, 255, 263 Caroline, 184 Carpenter, 206 Carrington, 176, 179 Carter, Colonel, 445 Carter House, 26, 27 Carter, Lieutenant T. H., 422, 460