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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 10, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

under consideration, and has not yet determined what rank above his present to assign him, but probably it will be nothing less than Brigadier General. Secretary Cameron speaks in terms of the highest praise of the rapid movement made by General Butler, in advancing upon and holding his present position at the Relay House.--General Scott is not less enthusiastic in his compliments to General Butler and his officers and men. The greatest activity is going on in the War and Navy DepartmeGeneral Butler and his officers and men. The greatest activity is going on in the War and Navy Departments, in the work of perfecting the details of encompassing and punishing the traitors who have thrown this country into its present condition. Another committee has been here from Baltimore, who reported to the President the present state of affairs in that city. The mob spirit is down, and the loyalists are preparing to welcome the Government troops. There will be at least three regiments raised in Baltimore, of one thousand each, and accepted by the Government, not withstanding the atte
Incidents at Butler's camp. --In an order promulgated by Gen. Butler of Mass., commander at the Relay House, on Wednesday, we find the announcement that a soldier named Charles Leonard, private in the New York Eighth Regiment, was killed by the accidental discharge of his musket, on the previous day. The order further says: "Wishing to establish the most friendly relations between you and this neighborhood, the General invited all venders of supplies to visit our camp and replenish oGen. Butler of Mass., commander at the Relay House, on Wednesday, we find the announcement that a soldier named Charles Leonard, private in the New York Eighth Regiment, was killed by the accidental discharge of his musket, on the previous day. The order further says: "Wishing to establish the most friendly relations between you and this neighborhood, the General invited all venders of supplies to visit our camp and replenish our somewhat scanty commissariat. But to his disgust and horror he finds well-authenticated evidence that a private in the Sixth Regiment has been poisoned by means of strychnine administered in the food brought into the camp by one of these peddlers. I am happy to be informed that the man is now out of danger. This act, of course, will render it necessary for me to cut off all purchases from unauthorized persons. Are our few insane enemies among the loyal men of Maryland prepared to wag
preparations hostile to Illinois were being made at any point near Cairo, Ill. There is an encampment of several hundred troops at Cornet, Miss., the junction of the Mobile and Ohio and Memphis and Charleston Railroad. Annapolis May 8. --The 20th New York regiment arrived here from Perryville this morning, and will proceed shortly to Washington. Capt. Schuyler Hamilton, from the Relay House, reports the entire line to that point in quiet possession of our troops. Gen. Butler is expected here to-day. Lieut. Crosby, of the U. S. Navy, has arrived in port with the light-boat heretofore stationed off Windmill Point, and his convoy in tow, the latter having exploded her boiler at the mouth of the Patuxent, severely scalding one man. The crew were transferred to the Thomas Sparks. The light-boat was found 12 miles up the Great Nicomico river.--The crew escaped, leaving a warm breakfast behind them. The log of the boat showed that three armed schooners had ta