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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 29 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Baltimore Sun: The Garibaldi Guard refuse Minnie muskets, and desire only rifles, with the use of which they are experts. One of the companies is French, most of whose men served in Algiers, one Swiss, one Italian, one Spanish. The remainder are Germans. The steamer City of Richmond, (one of the Philadelphia and Richmond line of steamers, which had been detained at the latter place, but afterwards, by order of the Governor, released,) is to load here with cannon, destined for Gen. Butler's command. They are of course for the field works in progress of erection to strengthen Fortress Monroe on the land side. As the mails between this city and Alexandria can now be conveyed safely, the Post-Office Department excepts route No. 4,240, Samuel M. Garwood contractor, from the general order of discontinuance issued a few days since. I hear in high Republican authorities that the White House is pretty nearly accessible to-day, and therefore it is supposed that important
ionism. They industriously give out to the South that slaves will not be liberated or interfered with. The one-eyed monster, drunken beast, and obese mountebank Butler, even Butler, assumes a marvelous scrupulosity as to the treatment he shall give to the runaway negroes; sends them back to their owners, or harnesses them to carButler, assumes a marvelous scrupulosity as to the treatment he shall give to the runaway negroes; sends them back to their owners, or harnesses them to carts at work in his fortifications, and treats them with liberal doses of the lash. No, no, abolitionism is no part of their purpose; they pray us to believe that much. We take them at their word; it is no part of their purpose. Their hue and cry against the South on that subject was all for Buncombe. Mrs. Harriet Stowe is no longer their prophet; nor Ward Beecher their brother of a prophet. Butler and Ellsworth and Billy Wilson, are their new divinities; Garrison, Phillips, and the John Browns, give out that they are not interested in this fight, which is not for the slave, but for trade. It is a war waged for precisely the objects which inspired
Gen. Butler. A gentleman in this city, of the highest character, who served with Gen. Butler as a Committeeman in the Charleston Democratic Convention, says, in a discussion which once occurred in the Convention, Mr. Smith, of California, son Gen. Butler as a Committeeman in the Charleston Democratic Convention, says, in a discussion which once occurred in the Convention, Mr. Smith, of California, son of Ex-Governor Smith, of Virginia, denounced Gen. Butler personally in the quest unmeasured terms, winding up by pronouncing him "a d — d coward," and that Butler turned very pale and quailed like a whipped hound beneath the anger of his adversary, Gen. Butler personally in the quest unmeasured terms, winding up by pronouncing him "a d — d coward," and that Butler turned very pale and quailed like a whipped hound beneath the anger of his adversary, not daring by word, look or action to resent it. It is suggested that if Mr. Smith were in Virginia, it might be well to send him down to Hampton, to look after the quandam committeeman from Massachusetts. Butler turned very pale and quailed like a whipped hound beneath the anger of his adversary, not daring by word, look or action to resent it. It is suggested that if Mr. Smith were in Virginia, it might be well to send him down to Hampton, to look after the quandam committeeman from Massachusett
Federal troops in the field. --It is estimated that the force of Federal troops now in service at the different points, which may be considered seats of war, amounts to about 94,000, and this does not include the men in the various camps, whose location is not yet decided upon. This force is stationed and commanded as follows: Location.Commander.No. of men. South side of Potomac.Brig. Gen, McDowell,21,000 Washington, &c.Brig.Gen.Mansfield.22,000 Fortress. Monroe.Maj. Gen. Butler9,000 Penn'a, West.Maj.Gen. Kerm10,000 Cincin'ti & West Va.Maj. Gen McClelland13,000 Cairo and vicinityBrig. Gen. Prenties5,000 Baltimore, &c.Br. Gen. Cadwallader6,000 Philadelphia, &c.Maj. Gen. Patterson3,000 Total95,000