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order came to me: headquarters Army of the Potomac. May 8th, 1864-1 P. M. General Sheridan, Commanding Cavalry Corps. The major-general commanding directs you to immediately concentrate your available mounted force, and with your ammunition trains and such supply trains as are filled (exclusive of ambulances) proceed against the enemy's cavalry, and when your supplies are exhausted, proceed via New Market and Green Bay to Haxall's Landing on the James River, there communicating with General Butler, procuring supplies and return to this army. Your dismounted men will be left with the train here. A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff. As soon as the above order was received I issued instructions for the concentration of the three divisions of cavalry at Aldrich's to prepare for the contemplated expedition. Three days rations for the men were distributed, and half rations of grain for one day were doled out for the horses. I sent for Gregg, Merritt, and Wilson and
e afternoon from colored people, to the effect that General B. F. Butler's army had reached a small stream on the south sideanding, but there was also a possibility that I could help Butler somewhat by joining him so near Richmond. Therefore, afte three brigades of infantry from the force confronting General Butler south of the James River, the alarm being intensified in my instructions where I was to obtain supplies from General Butler. We got to the James on the 14th with all our woundeders, as well as the captured guns, were turned over to General Butler's provost-marshal, and our wounded were quickly and kiin the way of forage and rations, were furnished us by general Butler, and the work of refitting for our return to the Army en carried out, and my thoughts then turned to joining General Butler to get supplies. I believed that I could do this by cthe shorter route. Moreover, my information regarding General Butler's position was incorrect, so that even had I been succ
to Shady Grove Church. The next day we passed over the battle-field of Spottsylvania Court House. The marks of the recent conflicts about there were visible on every hand, and in the neighboring houses were found many Union and Confederate wounded, who had been too severely hurt to be removed from the field-hospitals at the time of the battles. Such of our wounded as were able to travel were brought away. On the 16th I marched from Edge Hill on the Ta River through Bowling Green to Dr. Butler's, on the north side of the Mattapony. When I arrived here I was unable to ascertain the position of the Army of the Potomac, and was uncertain whether or not the base at the White House had been discontinued. I had heard nothing from the army for nine days except rumors through Southern sources, and under these circumstances did not like to venture between the Mattapony and Pamunkey rivers, embarrassed as I was with some four hundred wounded, five hundred prisoners, and about two thousa