Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for B. F. Butler or search for B. F. Butler in all documents.

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dition to Charles City courthouse. Official despatches. Fortress Monroe, Va., Dec. 14. General Wistar, with my approbation, sent out an expedition to Charles City Court-House on the James River, to capture the enemy's force stationed there, and I have the pleasure to forward his report of its complete success. What adds to the brilliancy of its achievement is that it has been accomplished during a terrible storm. B. F. Butler, Major-General. Yorktown, Va., Dec. 14, 1863. Major-General Butler: I have the satisfaction to announce the complete success of the expedition sent out under Colonel West. All worked in successful combination. Our cavalry carried the enemy's camp at Charles City Court-House after sharp fighting — the enemy firing from their houses. We captured eight officers and eighty-two enlisted men, being the whole command of three companies, fifty-five horses and three mules, besides many shot, etc., left on the ground. The enemy's camp, with its equipmen
xpedition. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Monday, January 4. The success which crowned the late expedition of Colonel Draper, of the Second North-Carolina (colored) regiment, to Princess Anne County, resulting in the enlistment of a large number of recruits, the release from bondage of hundreds of slaves, the discomfiture of the guerrillas and the capture of their chief, induced General Wild, the commander of the colored troops in this department, with the approbation of Major-General Butler, to plan a raid of a similar character, but on a much more extensive scale, beyond our lines into North-Carolina. This plan was in one respect entirely original. The success of a raid is usually made to depend upon the secrecy with which it is undertaken, and the rapidity with which it is executed — a dash into the enemy's country, rest nowhere, and a hasty return. But General Wild resolved to be absent a month, to occupy and evacuate towns at his leisure, relying upon a novel spec