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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
he subject has been fully and exhaustively treated by Colonel Archer, in an address delivered before the A. P. Hill Camp of Confederate Veterans on the 6th of June, 1889, and published in Mr. George S. Bernard's book of War Talks of Confederate Veterans. To Mr. Bernard's industrious researches I am also indebted for some extracts I have made use of from the published Records of the Rebellion. When, on the 5th of May, 1864, the disturbing news was brought to the city of Petersburg that a formidable army, with General Benjamin F. Butler as its commander, had landed at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, within a few hours' easy march of the town, the greatest consternation prevailed. The practically defenceless situation of the town, guarded, as it was, by a few hundred regular soldiers, and about the same number of untried and raw militia, was well calculated to excite the worst apprehensions. The reputation and character of the Federal general enhanced the universal feeling of alarm.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Beauregard too much for Butler. (search)
Beauregard too much for Butler. General Butler, however, made Richmond his objective point of attack, and not Petersburg. He soon found he had caught a Tarter in General Beauregard, and after the severe defeat he sustained at his hands, the milGeneral Butler, however, made Richmond his objective point of attack, and not Petersburg. He soon found he had caught a Tarter in General Beauregard, and after the severe defeat he sustained at his hands, the military nerves of our modern Achilles were so unstrung that he had no stomach for any further fighting at that time. The Richmond Examiner of the day indeed aptly compared Butler to a turkey buzzard matched against a great gyr falcon, and the result Butler to a turkey buzzard matched against a great gyr falcon, and the result proved the truth of its prognostications. Finding that the enemy did not appear to be disposed to molest us, many went back to their various occupations, but ready to be called upon at a moment's warning, and so it happened that on the fateful dayery amusing, but it seems something like prophecy as to what did occur later on. The fateful day at length drew near. Butler, aroused from his inertia and fully appraised of the weakness of our defenses, made an effort to redeem his reputation, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Petersburg to be crushed. (search)
ntended to be the forerunner of Grant's subsequent move upon Petersburg. The inspiration evidently came from General Grant, for in a bitter letter written by General Butler to General Gilmore after the operations of the day, censuring him in unmeasured terms for his failure, he mentions the fact of an officer of General Grant's staff being present when instructions were given to him. General Gilmore failed to carry out his instructions, and wrote the following letter to General Butler: headquarters. Elick Jordan's, June 9, 1864, 12:30 P. M. Major-General Butler: I found the enemy prepared for me to all appearances. A prisoner says our movement wasMajor-General Butler: I found the enemy prepared for me to all appearances. A prisoner says our movement was known at 1:00 this morning, and that reinforcements arrived by railroad. General Hinks, on the Jordan's Point road, says he cannot carry the works in his front, and that since he arrived there, at 7:30 A. M., two more regiments have been added to the intrenchments coming from the city. In Hawley's front the works are as strong,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Day for fighting. (search)
y false reports, some were disposed to treat the matter lightly, and while some believed and hastened to put their armor on, others believed not. It was then about eleven o'clock. Among the first I summoned was Mr. Charles Campbell, well known as the author of the History of Virginia. He was at that time principal of the Anderson Seminary, on Washington Street. Mr. Campbell was an ardent patriot, and although exempt by reason of age and profession from military duty, at the first news of Butler's landing he shouldered his musket with the alacrity of youth and fell into ranks with those who were rushing to the defence of the city. For several weeks he and his youthful assistant, Mr. Branch T. Archer (late of Richmond), had done faithful duty on the lines. In common with many others, they had returned to their professional duties, ready to be called upon at a moment's notice. School was in session, and as I approached the house, I heard the sound of busy voices within, and when
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Action of Graham's Battery. (search)
ond and Petersburg. He was the son of a British army officer and his martial instinct was an inheritance. He had been a Lieutenant in the old Petersburg Artillery and went into the war at its commencement with his company. He was a brave, energetic and faithful officer and a strict disciplinarian. He had been attached to several commands and had seen much service at various points in eastern North Carolina and southern Virginia. At this time he was attached to the forces in front of General Butler, north of the Appomattox. He was noted especially for the admirable condition in which he kept his battery, attracting the attention of the great Commander-in-chief, who had an eye for everything from the spoke of a wagon wheel up. He sent for him and complimented him on its prime condition and praise from him was certainly a compliment. Receiving orders early on the morning of the 9th to move his battery to the east of the city on the City Point Road, he proceeded to carry out his i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Not afraid of Yanks. (search)
immensely and he was made quite a pet of. During the day we were taken up to Butler's headquarters. Along with two lads, mere boys, who were severely wounded, I wise's brigade. They informed me they had come over two days before. Doubtless Butler derived much information from them as to the defenceless condition of the town. In Vinculus, has given a full account of his conversation with the general. Butler in his letter to General Gilmore thus refers to this interview: You made no sucarm was given. It is an interesting coincidence that the school-master to whom Butler refers in his letter was young Archer, who was teaching in his school at the Aneport for duty at the front, as I have already related. You will notice that Butler used the word examined in his letter to Gilmore. It is a term that a military nd pseudo warrior. During the day a piece of artillery was brought up before Butler's tent for his inspection, and I recognized it as the gun of Sturdivant's latte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.41 (search)
th works of art and vertu accumulated by years of traveling and careful selections in Europe, was seized by the Federals and used as a residence by some of the officers. Much of the silver, paintings and bric-a-brac was shipped to New England by Butler and other officers to their homes. This is probably the origin of the story of General Butler and the spoons. They were never recovered, and it was many years before Mr. Payne regained possession of his home in New Orleans. Within the two yeGeneral Butler and the spoons. They were never recovered, and it was many years before Mr. Payne regained possession of his home in New Orleans. Within the two years after the beginning of the war Mr. Payne found himself stripped of every earthly possession of value and in debt over $700,000. He bravely went to work to pay this debt off, and after some sixteen or eighteen years of hard work he succeeded in paying it all. When I last saw him he was ninty-four or ninty-six years old, and was at his office and dealing in cotton every day. I went in to pay my respects, and told him I had come to New Orleans to buy a team of horses. He at once jumped up and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
fourth corporal; wounded in the mouth in battle of Seven Pines June 1, 1862; transferred to 2nd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry. Privates. Byers, David H., arm shattered in battle of Seven Pines, June 1, 1862; honorably discharged by reason of fifth wound. Bowles, John W., detailed brigade blacksmith. Bellomy, Andrew J., enlisted August 22, 1862. Brockman, Butley, severely wounded in face in Second Manassas battle, August 30, 1862. Brockman, James P., enlisted August 22, 1862. Butler, Jacob W., killed August 30, 1862, in second battle of Manassas. Brockman, Walter D., died at home, August 21, 1861, of typhoid fever. Beck, T. J., died September 15, 1861. Bramham, John H., transferred to other service. Bramham, James G., promoted first sergeant; severely wounded in second battle of Manassas, August 30, 1862; right arm paralyzed. Carden, William B., killed in battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Carden, R. E. Carden, John A., wounded in left leg in batt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
served from April 23, 1862, to 1865; lost an arm. Second Lieutenant, John W. Davidson, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. Third Lieutenant, William N. Parsley, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. Allan, James B. Allan, Robert (dead). Atkins, H. C. Atkins, William T. (dead). Batkins, Cornelius (dead). Bowles, William. Boyd, George G. (dead). Boyd, William (dead). Brown, Lucian. Brown, P. H. (lost arm and leg; dead). Burch, E. T. Burton, Marcus. Butler, John M. (dead). Carlton, Charles. Cook, Lawrence (dead). Corbin, John G. Cosby, John O. (wounded and dead). Christian, Horace (dead). Christian, R. A. (detailed; dead). Crump, Edward. Curtis, Armistead (dead). Dunn, John H. (killed at Drewry's Bluff). Dunn, Charles (killed at Drewry's Bluff). Dunn, Robert S. (wounded; dead). Dunn, Henry C. Ellett, Thaddeus (wounded). Ellerson, Thomas H. (wounded). Gaines, William (detailed). Gray, John (wounde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
i Troops in Virginia, 1861-5 58 Morgan's Raid through Ohio and Indiana, 110; in Kentucky 263; Horses Impressed, 118 Moore J. Staunton, 121 Morris Island Prisoners Fired on, 275 Negroes. As Slaves The Loyalty of, 29, 52 63, 64, 69 Monument to, at Fort Mill S. C.. 67 Their Memorial Window to Jackson 97 With Gen. Morgan, 120 Proposed to be Freed and made Soldiers, 181 New Market Battle of 155 Cadets killed at, 231 O'Keefe; Chaplain Matthew, 176 Yellow Fever Hero 177 Defied Gen. Butler 182 Olds, F. A., 322 Parham Ensign J. T.. 348 Parker's Battery Capt. W. W., 103 Gen. S. 1). Lee's regard for 103 Pegram Gen. W. R. J., 57 Payne, J. U.; His sacrifices for the Southern Cause, 127 Payne, Gen., Wm. H., 134 Petersburg. Defence of, in June, 1864, 1 Tablet to the Killed, 12 Polignac C. J.; His Mission to France in 1865 326 Prison Pens at Point Lookout 19 Quisenberry, Adam Chenault, 259 Ramsay, C. S. Navy, Lieut. J. F.. 242 Ridley, Capt. killed, 43