hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for I. C. Butler or search for I. C. Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
. W. H. Darnall, Capt. J. E. Stallings; 42d Ga. (consolidated 36th and 42d Ga., and parts of 34th and 56th Ga.), Lieut.-Col. L. P. Thomas. Pettus's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. W. Pettus: 19th Ala., Lieut.-Col. E. S. Gulley: 20th Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Elliott; 23d Ala., Maj. J. T. Hester; 54th Va. Batt'n, Lieut.-Col. C. H:. Lynch. artillery: S. C. Battery, Capt. J. T. Kanapaux. cavalry, Lieut.-Gen. Wade Hampton. Consisted of Lieut.-Gen. Joseph Wheeler's corps and the division of Maj.-Gen. I. C. Butler, embracing, in part, the following-named organizations: 1st Ala.,----; 3d Ala.,----; 51st Ala., Col. M. L. Kirkpatrick; 1st Ga.,----; 2d Ga.,----; 3d Ga.,----; 4th Ga.,----; 5th Ga., Col. Edward Bird; 6th Ga.,----; 12th Ga., Capt. J. H. Graham; 1st Tenn., Col. James T. Wheeler; 2d Tenn., Col. H. M. Ashby; 4th Tenn., Col. Baxter Smith; 5th Tenn., Col. George W. McKenzie; 8th Tenn.,----; 9th Tenn. Battalion, Maj. James I. Akin; 3d Confederate,----; 8th Confederate, Lieut.-Col. John S.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
arance of the enemy. In addition to the troops already mentioned, there were here Wheeler's and Butler's commands of cavalry, and several unattached bodies of State troops and reserves. A rapid concnly troops in and around the city were Stevenson's division, Wheeler's cavalry, and a portion of Butler's division, in all about five thousand of all arms. Practically there was no force in the city,y on the morning of the 20th, Brigadier-General Law, whom I had placed temporarily in command of Butler's division in the unavoidable absence of that officer, reported that the right wing of the Federld meet the attack of the approaching force. I prolonged the rear line taken by Hoke by placing Butler's and Wheeler's commands on his left, and while doing this we met and checked a sharp attack. S the operations described, but they were important and were gallantly performed. The cavalry of Butler and Wheeler numbered, I think, about three thousand men, and after the engagement became general
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
mode of operating them. On the 7th the gun-boat Shawsheen was destroyed by batteries from the shore, and most of her crew were captured. During May the monitors remained between Trent's Reach and City Point, protecting the right flank of General Butler's army. [See map, p. 198.] The fighting was principally in Trent's Reach, where the Confederates were erecting batteries. They built a strong work at Howlett's, so placed that it could not be destroyed by the fire of the monitors. This wn view, however, of the overwhelming importance of the river as a base of operations and means of communication, General Grant had determined that he would not take the chances of a naval contest for its control, and he had previously ordered General Butler to procure and sink a number of hulks in the channel at Trent's Reach. The obstructions were put in position between the 15th and 18th of June, and the operations of the fleet for the remainder of the summer were confined to desultory engage
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
s's division had been driven in, and both he and Crawford were falling back upon Griffin. Miles, of Humphreys's corps, was sent to reenforce Warren, and by noon the enemy was checked. As soon as General Grant was advised of the situation, he directed General Meade to take the offensive vigorously. Miles made a movement to the left and attacked in flank the troops in front of Warren, and the enemy soon fell back. General Grant had now ridden out to the front, and hearing that he was at Mrs. Butler's house near the Boydton plank-road, I joined him there. It was then a little after 1 o'clock. He had in the meantime ordered the headquarters camp to be moved to Dabney's Mill, on a cross-road running from the Boydton plank to the Vaughan road, and about two miles from Meade's headquarters, which were near the crossing of the Vaughan road and Hatcher's Run. The general was becoming apprehensive lest the infantry force that had moved against Warren might turn upon Sheridan, who had only