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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 55 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. C. Butler or search for M. C. Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
's division. reported as detached. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee. Wickham's brigade. Brigadier-General W. C. Wickham. First Virginia, Colonel R. W. Carter. Second Virginia, Colonel T. T. Munford, Third Virginia, Colonel T. H. Owen. Fourth Virginia, Colonel W. H. Payne. Lomax's brigade. Brigadier General L. L. Lomax. Fifth Virginia, Colonel H. Clay Pate. Sixth Virginia, Colonel Julian Harrison. Fifteenth Virginia, Colonel C. R. Collins. Butler's division. Major-General M. C. Butler. Dunovants brigade. Brigadier-General John Dunovant. Third South Carolina, [Colonel C. J. Colcock.] Fourth South Carolina, [Colonel B. H. Rutledge.] Fifth [Sixth] South Carolina, Colonel [H. K.] Aiken. Young's brigade. Brigadier-General P. M. B. Young. Cobb's Georgia Legion, Colonel G J. Wright, Phillips' Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Rich. Jeff. Davis Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel J. F. Waring. Miller's Legion,—— —— Love's Legion,—— ——. Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
repare to march. The general impression is that we are going out to join battle with the enemy. The Rev. Dr. Palmer delivered an eloquent and soul-stirring address to our brigade, and concluded with a fervent prayer for the safety of our army, and the success of our righteous cause. The scene was grandly inspiring. Thousands of soldiers stood with uncovered heads while the eloquent divine lifted up his voice to heaven for our protection, and when he read the infamous proclamation of General Butler not a word was spoken, but the firm, resolute look, the compressed lip, and flashing eye of every soldier, said plainer than words could say, that the insolent invaders of our sacred soil should never cross our intrenchments without walking over the dead bodies of sixty thousand determined and indignant men. I record the infamous proclamation: As officers and soldiers of the United States have been subjected to repeated insults from women, calling themselves ladies of New Orleans,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A morning call on General Kilpatrick. (search)
f the homes and the means of subsistence of noncombatants. The principal agent to whom this devastation was entrusted, General Kilpatrick, commanded Sherman's cavalry. A brief interview with him is the raison d'etre of the present article. Butler's cavalry division had been detached from the Army of Northern Virginia in the latter part of December, 1864, and had been sent to South Carolina to operate against Sherman, a duty which it performed until the end of the war. Although a division such of the men as I could make out in the darkness were close to their horses, and that the animals were saddled and bitted, ready to be mounted. I soon discovered the explanation of all this. At dusk in the evening, in a drizzling rain, General Butler had been reconnoitering at some little distance in advance of his command, accompanied by only his staff and a few couriers. Riding at the head of this little band he was met by a body of horsemen coming from the opposite direction. To hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina. (search)
l hope of a change for the better seemed to have been destroyed, when it was determined to make some feeble effort to stay the progress of misrule by joining the ranks of the Republicans. The project was to leave the power in their hands, but to infuse into it a beam of purity by giving offices to the white men. Accordingly a reform ticket was offered to the votes of the people, at the head of which was the Republican Judge Carpenter, who had not unworthily filled the judicial bench; General M. C. Butler consented to be a candidate for the office of Lieutenant-Governor, and in the selection of other candidates, while the most notorious rogues were excluded, a larger proportion of Republicans, more blacks than whites, were nominated. It was strictly and emphatically a Reform party; all partisan politics were studiously excluded. The effort failed, because it deserved to fail; it deserved to fail because it associated itself with a party rotten to the core. The relief could not come,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
Yours, very respectfully, James H. Lane. Colonel Z. Davis, of Charleston, S. C., desires the Roster of the Cavalry Corps corrected to read as follows: Butler's Division, Major-General M. C. Butler; Dunevant's Brigade, Brigadier-General John Dunevant; Fourth South Carolina, Colonel B. H. Rutledge; Fifth South Carolina, Major-General M. C. Butler; Dunevant's Brigade, Brigadier-General John Dunevant; Fourth South Carolina, Colonel B. H. Rutledge; Fifth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel R. J. Jeffards; Sixth South Carolina, Colonel H. K. Aiken. The Third South Carolina Cavalry, Colonel Colcock, was never in Virginia, or in Butler's Brigade. General Dunevant was killed October I, 1864, and Lieutenant-Colonel Jeffards October 27, 1864, from which time I had the honor of commanding the Fifth. Butler's Brigade. General Dunevant was killed October I, 1864, and Lieutenant-Colonel Jeffards October 27, 1864, from which time I had the honor of commanding the Fifth. is the Eclectic history of the United States A fit book to be taught in Southern schools?—This is a book written by Miss M. E. Thalheimer, and published by the enterprising house of Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati and New York. Its friends claim for it great fairness in its narrative, and that it is non-partizan in its tr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina— administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
d be again delivered up. It does not appear that he took any steps to execute his promise, and for several days Edgefield was the scene of riot and incendiary outrages. Houses were burned in the dead of night at the peril of the inmates. General M. C. Butler's house was burned, and a party implicated in the crime asserted that he had done it at the instigation of Tennant. Affairs were daily becoming worse and worse; it was discovered that hired laborers were leagued with Tennant against the pthe scene of disorder, sent one of his henchmen—one General Dennis—to preserve the peace. Tennant retired to the swamp, and Dennis retired to his superior, defeated and disappointed. The eccentric Judge Mackey was now sent as a peacemaker. General Butler was arrested on a charge by Tennant that his life was threatened by him, but the charge was not sustained. A sort of peace was trumped up by Mackey, how, we do not know. In his report he denounced the government of Edgefield as the most inf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina—Administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
rs which a partisan press could invent. Gen. M. C. Butler, one of Carolina's favorite and most truas something not reported; that a man like General Butler had too much at stake to become the champi the report of Stover and Chamberlain is true, Butler should have counselled them to go home and lea catastrophe. Our statement is taken from General Butler's letters, and from the testimony elicitedrsed. Here, then, was reasonable ground for Mr. Butler to complain. The militia had not only, in v case was adjourned to the 8th he sent for General Butler to act as his legal adviser. On this suhis men. Several persons (negroes) came to General Butler to offer to accommodate matters, to all ofated. While thus waiting for a settlement General Butler went to Augusta on private business, and tven up and sent to the Governor. Rivers asked Butler whether he would be responsible for their delivery if surrendered. Butler replied in the affirmative, and said that he was willing to give a bond[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Seventeenth Virginia infantry at Flat Creek and Drewry's Bluff. (search)
to the then struggling Confederacy. The great battle of the Wilderness commenced between Lee and Grant on the 6th May. Butler, with 20,000 men, had thrown himself between Petersburg and Richmond; Kautz, with a strong force of cavalry, had cut the ld have followed by an assault of the town in force, but for the vigorous opening of that memorable campaign by Grant and Butler, and he was reluctantly compelled to make a forced retrograde movement to Kingston, and from thence via Weldon for Petersarrival, to our dismay we found that three regiments of our brigade, General Corse and staff, were near Richmond, and General Butler in between. To my military readers this forced orphanage of a whole regiment from its military head and family will e field officer and thirty men killed and wounded, stood ready the next day to still farther tighten the cords around General Butler's lines in Bermuda Hundreds. So ends my article, written with the hope of its meeting the eye of some old soldier
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
ilty. Had I applied the torch without regard to consequences, I would have pursued a course which would have been fully vindicated as an act of just retaliation for the unparalleled acts of brutality perpetrated by your own army on our own soil. But we do not war upon women and children. Compare General Orders No. 72 of the immortal Lee——redolent, even amid the smoke and carnage of the hottest warfare, of exalted civilization and generous humanity—with the atrocious proclamations of General Butler or the vandal acts of Sheridan, and then listen to the words of Polybius, spoken when the world was two thousand years younger than it now is, and uttered not in the tone of passion and hate so rife in his day, but in inculcation of the soundest lessons of political and moral wisdom: When men proceed to wreak their fury on senseless objects, whose destruction will neither be of advantage to themselves nor in the slightest degree disable their opponent from carrying on the war, especially<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reconstruction in South Carolina. (search)
red men rode in town on the track of the Radicals and sent a civil message to the Governor that they were anxious to have an opportunity of speaking to the blacks, and proposed that the meeting should be a joint discussion. As there could be no reasonable objection to this reasonable request, it was granted. Chamberlain began the discussion; he was tame and dull, and it was no wonder, for he had to confront men whom he had denounced as murderers and conspirators. He was replied to by General Butler and General Gary, both of whom handled him without gloves. Several annoying accidents happened to disgust the Radicals, and the meeting was broken up. The excentric Judge Mackey, who had gone to the meeting with the Governor, remained with the Democrats. A like meeting was held a few days afterwards at Newberry. It must be borne in mind that the Radical party looked upon the black population as their own, and any attempt on the part of the Democrats to win them was regarded as a tresp
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