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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 55 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. C. Butler or search for M. C. Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
ation of Texas was one of the prominent questions in 1844. Before Clay wrote his celebrated Raleigh letter, defining his position with regard to it, Marshall declared himself in favor of annexation, and spoke, upon the invitation of many persons, on that subject in Lexington. In 1845 Marshall again entered the political field and ran for Congress against the Hon. Garrett Davis. Some time before the district had given Clay a majority of , 5000, and Governor William Owsley, when he defeated Butler, a majority of 1,300. Marshall was beaten by Davis, 700 votes. During the canvass he gave a full and graphic history of the Congress of which he was a member, and vindicated his vote for James K. Polk on national grounds. He declared that, under similar circumstances, he would have voted against General Washington himself, and that the territory between the Sabine and the Rio Grande, and stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean, was worth more to the United States than fou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Southern Historical Society: its origin and history. (search)
A. Henry, Jr., Colonel T. B. Roy, Captain E. Thornton Taylor. Texas—Colonel A. W. Speight, Major F. Charles Hume, Major D. F. Holland. South Carolina—General M. C. Butler, Major C. H. Suber. Kentucky—Colonel William Preston Johnston. Maryland—H. C. Turnbull, Jr. Mississippi—General W. T. Martin, Major D. W. Flowerre, pointed the previous day, consisting of Admiral Semmes (chairman), General Fitzhugh Lee, General Maury, General Hebert, Colonel John McKinney, General Wilcox, General Butler, General Martin, General Early, Colonel Venable, and Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston, made the following report, which was adopted: Resolved, i. That the headel George Wythe Munford, of Virginia. Vice-Presidents of States. General Isaac R. Trimble, Maryland. Governor Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina. General M. C. Butler, South Carolina. Admiral R. Semmes, Alabama. Colonel W. Call, Florida. General Will. T. Martin, Mississippi. General J. B. Hood, Louisiana.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 27 (search)
n New York, The University of Virginia (gallantry of its students and professors), Jefferson College (service of its students and of Professor Hunter McGuire, M. D.), The Dahlgren Raid, Maps, Diagrams, Geographical Information, Federal Military Documents (National Cemeteries in Virginia), Loyalty in the State, The Confederate Government and the State, Personals, Obituaries, Arrests, etc., The Specie and the Treasury of Virginia, The War in Virginia, Richmond (the siege of), Norfolk (Geneeral Butler's Rule, etc.), Saltville, Hampton—Burning of the Town, Slavery and Emancipation, The Peace Question (efforts of the Committee of Nine), Department of Confederate Regiments, Department of Confederate Generals, Biographical Sketches, etc. At the last session of Congress a bill was reported in the House of Representatives for the purchase of this historical treasury at a cost of $30,000—this work upon which the patriotic and untiring compiler has been devotedly engaged for more than thirty y