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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 55 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. C. Butler or search for M. C. Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The prison experience of a Confederate soldier. (search)
n May, 1864, by the failure of General Whiting to come up from Swift Creek, General Butler and his army escaped capture, and made good their retreat to the entrenchedy followed by General Beauregard's little army, which took position in front of Butler, on a line extending from the Howlett House, on James River, overlooking Dutch ed by throwing up heavy earthworks, and thus, in the language of General Grant, Butler was bottled. In this position Butler and Beauregard confronted each other tiButler and Beauregard confronted each other till the early part of June, when the greater part of Butler's troops were withdrawn and sent to reinforce General Grant about Cold Harbor, and all of General BeauregarButler's troops were withdrawn and sent to reinforce General Grant about Cold Harbor, and all of General Beauregard's forces, except Bushrod Johnson's Brigade, of which my regiment, the Sixty-third Tennessee Infantry, formed a part, were sent to reinforce General Lee. Johnson's then said we would be exchanged at Wilmington, N. C. When we reached there, General Butler's army on transports, with a fleet of war vessels, were making preparations
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
nant John F. Lanneau, of Hampton's engineer corps, wrote Major McClellan, Hampton's adjutant-general, for a detail of forty men and two commissioned officers from Butler's and W. H. F. Lee's Divisions. He would furnish the detachment with tools; they would be armed with pistols, and would serve during the expedition as a mounted hnson, Company A, Fourth South Carolina Cavalry, and Lieutenant Bauskett, Sixth South Carolina Cavalry, as suitable officers to take charge of the detail from General Butler's Division. The detail from General W. H. F. Lee's Division was ordered to report to Lieutenant F. Robertson at General W. H. F. Lee's headquarters, and to their dignity and trot to keep up with the hurrying column. Among the killed was the gallant McCalla, of the First South Carolina Cavalry. He and Hogan, one of Butler's scouts, were along and rendered valuable service. We had traveled 100 miles and had two fights, and, best of all, had furnished fresh meat for General Lee's st
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
l. Broyles, J. J., Assistant Surgeon, Sept. 30, 1863, 18th Georgia Regiment. Reported to this office Dec. 16, ‘63. Butler, Jasper Francis, Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Oct. 14. ‘62, as Surgeon 13th Arkansas Regiment, to rank from Augor Surgeon Brigade, March 31, ‘64, 1st and 27th Tennessee Regiments. Buie, Wm. E., Surgeon, Dec. 1, ‘62. Resigned. Butler, Thos. H., contract $80, made by J. P. Logan, August 12, ‘62, closed Dec. 13, ‘62. Bruce, Allen A., Assistant Surgeo1853, May 31, ‘63, no change. Evans, John B, Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board at Chattanooga Aug. 1 ‘63. Feb. 28, ‘63, Butler's Regiment Cavalry, April 30, ‘63, 1st Kentucky, Oct. 2, ‘63, captured. Exchanged and reported to Medical-Director, Dec.r, June 13, ‘63, to rank from Dec. 19, ‘62, reported to General A. Buford, com'd to rank from Sept. 2, ‘62. Feb. 28, ‘63, Butler's Regiment Cavalry. Passed Board at Chattanooga, Aug. I, ‘63. April 30, ‘63, 1st Kentucky Cav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
vannah with great gallantry and engineering skill, but he was engaged in but three great actions during the war—Manassas, in 1861; Shiloh, in 1862; and Petersburg, in 1864. He was victorious in the first, fortune failed him in the second, it perched again upon his banner in the last, when he saved the Cockade City, the very day Early saved Lynchburg, after a three days fight against enormous odds, in one of the best fought battles of the civil war, which followed his skillful bottling up of Butler at Drewry's Bluff. But in his case, as in Joseph E. Johnston's, the record is so fragmentary, after Manassas neither of them tried conclusions with an adversary in general engagement (Beauregard at Petersburg excepted), neither of them drove an enemy off the field of conflict—and, whatever their abilities, which undoubtedly were great, they were never put to final tests by uninterrupted campaigns, and can hence not be the subject of satisfactory comparison. Battles unfought and campaigns
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
hom took part in the stirring events of the war. They were as follows: General John B. Gordon, General James A. Walker, General William McComb, General George Moorman, General Joseph Wheeler, General Dabney H. Maury, General Harry Heth, General M. C. Butler, General T. L. Rosser, General William H. Payne, General L. L. Lomax, General Scott Shipp, General T. A. Brander and Staff, General D. A. Weisiger, General George H. Stuart, Dr. Stuart McGuire, Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel Charles S.uring the first year of the war, and which was on his person during every battle in which Kershaw's Division, Army of Northern Virginia, took part. The colors carried by the veterans was the battle-flag of the Fifth South Carolina Regiment, of Butler's Brigade. Many bullet-holes testify that its supporters always asked a place in the picture near the flashing of the guns. The South Carolinians carried branches of palmetto, and wore cockades in hats and button-holes. They had travelled fa