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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 41 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for W. R. Butler or search for W. R. Butler in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.20 (search)
ustified him in crossing the river.--W. B. Franklin. General Burnside opened the conference by stating that within a few days he proposed to cross the river to offer battle to General Lee, and that after a close study of the reports of his engineers he had chosen Skinker's Neck as the point of crossing. Skinker's Neck is a shoe-shaped bend in the Rappahannock River, about twelve miles below Fredericksburg. It offered all the necessary military features for forcing a crossing, but, like Butler's famous bottle at Bermuda Hundred, also presented great facilities for preventing the egress of an army which had effected an entrance on its peninsula. After developing to a limited extent his plans, the general said that any one present was at liberty to express his views on the subject. General Sumner, if I recollect aright, remarked only that he would do his utmost to carry out the plans of the commanding general. General Franklin said that we could doubtless effect a crossing at the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
ol. William H. Browne; 2d R. I., Col. Frank Wheaton, Lieut.-Col. Nelson Viall. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 14 == 17. Third Brigade, Col. Thomas A. Rowley, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton: 62d N. Y., Maj. Wilson Hubbell; 93d Pa., Maj. John M. Mark; 98th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Adolph Mehler; 102d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph M. Kinkead; 139th Pa., Lieut.-Col. James D. Owens. Brigade loss: w, 6; m, 6 == 12. Artillery: C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Michael Hall; G, 2d U. S., Lieut. John LI. Butler. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 8 == 10. cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George D. Bayard (k), Col. David McM. Gregg: Indep't Co., D. C., Lieut. Williams H. Orton; 1st Me., Lieut.-Col. Calvin S. Douty; 1st N. J., Lieut.-Col. Joseph Karge; 2d N. Y., Maj. Henry E. Davies' 10th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Irvine; 1st Pa., Col. Owen Jones. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 3 == 4. Artillery: C, 3d U. S., Capt. Horatio G. Gibson. Total Union loss: killed, 1284; wounded, 9600; captured or missing, 1769 == 12,653
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
nce of McClernand, On the 21st of October, 1862, Secretary Stanton by a confidential order authorized Major-General John A. McClernand, then in Washington, to proceed to the States of Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa for the purpose of raising and organizing troops for an expedition, to be commanded by him, having for its object the capture of Vicksburg, the freeing of the Mississippi, and the opening of navigation to New Orleans. On the 9th of November General Banks was ordered to relive General Butler, at New Orleans, and proceed to open the Mississippi from below. General McClernand was authorized to show his confidential orders to the governors of the States named, but they were not communicated to General Grant, who, on October 16th, was formally assigned to the command of the Department of the Tennessee, a command he had been exercising ever since Halleck went to Washington in July.* Being advised, however, of the President's strong desire for a movement against Vicksburg, Genera
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
ugh those at Grand Gulf inflicted some damage on two of the gun-boats which attacked them on June 9th. No serious obstruction, however, to the passage of the river from Cairo to the sea now existed, except at Vicksburg. The advance division of Farragut's squadron under Commander Lee in the Oneida had summoned Vicksburg to surrender on the 18th of May, but had met with a refusal. Farragut, arriving soon after, held a consultation with General Williams, who commanded a small detachment of Butler's army, and the two came to the conclusion that they had not enough men to make an attempt on Vicksburg with any hope of success, and Farragut went back to New Orleans. Soon after, Farragut received pressing instructions from the Navy Department to attack Vicksburg, and in consequence returned up the river with his squadron, the mortar-boats under Porter, and 3000 troops under Williams. On the night of the 26th of June Porter placed his mortar-boats in position, nine on the eastern and e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 6.79 (search)
ant-General, U. S. V. On the 1st of May General Butler took possession of New Orleans, and immedifter-ward of all its outlying defenses. General Butler at once declared martial law (by a proclamas to follow. The whole force assigned to General Butler, for all purposes, was 18,000, but his act,000; it was now probably about 13,000. General Butler raised, on his own motion, two good regimeouisiana native guards (a name captured by General Butler), Colonels Spencer H. Stafford, Nathan W. ved the fleet up the river, and on the 8th General Butler sent Brigadier-General Thomas Williams, winsin, who had been sent up from New Orleans by Butler on receiving the first news of the battle. Be an effective defense against numbers. By General Butler's orders the library and a statue of Washi, 2 batteries and 4 troops of cavalry, and General Butler committed to his hands the preparations fod of the Department of the Gulf to relieve General Butler. Burning of the State-House, Baton Roug[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
ort Hudson. by Richard B. Irwin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. General Banks arrived in New Orleans on the 14th of December, 1862, with the advance of a fleet of transports from New York and Hampton Roads, bringing reenforcements for the Department of the Gulf. These reenforcements finally included 39 regiments of infantry (of which 22 were 9-months' men), six batteries of artillery, and one battalion of cavalry. On the 15th he took command of the department, Butler then formally taking leave of the troops. His orders were to move up the Mississippi, in order to open the river, in cooperation with McClernand's column from Cairo. Banks was to take command of the combined forces as soon as they should meet. On the 16th General Grover, with 12 regiments and a battery, without disembarking at New Orleans, accompanied by two batteries and two troops of cavalry from the old force, and convoyed by a detachment of Farragut's fleet under Captain James Alden
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
e. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen.-: Daniel W. Adams (w), Col. Randall L. Gibson: 32d Ala., Lieut.-Col. Henry Maury (wa, Col. Alexander McKinstry; 13th and 20th La., Col. Randall L. Gibson, Maj. Charles Guillet; 16th and 25th La., Col. S. W. Fisk (k), Maj. F. C. Zacharie; 14th La. Battalion, Maj. J. E. Austin; 5th Battery Washington (La.) Art'y, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught. Brigade loss: k, 112; w, 445; m, 146 = 703. Second Brigade, Col. J. B. Palmer, Brig.-Gen. Gideon J. Pillow: 18th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. W. R. Butler, Col. J. B. Palmer (w); 26th Tenn., Col. John M. Lillard; 28th Tenn., Col. P. D. Cunningham (k); 45th Tenn., Col. A. Searcy; Ga. Battery (Moses's), Lieut. X. W. Anderson. Brigade loss: k, 49; w, 324; m, 52 = 425. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Preston: 1st and 3d Fla., Col. William Miller (w); 4th Fla., Col. William L. L. Bowen; 60th N. C., Col. J. A. McDowell; 20th Tenn., Col. T. B. Smith (w), Lieut.-Col. F. M. Lavender, Maj. F. Claybrooke; Tenn. Battery, Capt. E. E. Wright (k)
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
; m, 1 == 2. Johnson's Brigade (attached to Johnson's Provisional Division), Brig.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson, Col. J. S. Fulton: 17th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. Watt W. Floyd; 23d Tenn., Col. R. H. Keeble; 25th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. B. Snowden; 44th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. J. L. McEwen, Jr. (w), Maj. G. M. Crawford; Ga. Battery, Lieut. W. S. Everett. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 271; m, 74 == 373. Brown's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown (w), Col. Edmund C. Cook: 18th Tenn., Col. J. B. Palmer (w), Lieut.-Col. W. R. Butler (w), Capt. Gideon H. Lowe; 26th Tenn., Col. J. M. Lillard (k), Maj. R. M. Saffell; 32d Tenn., Col. Edmund C. Cook, Capt. C. G. Tucker; 45th Tenn., Col. A. Searcy; 23d Tenn. Batt., Maj. T. W. Newman (w), Capt. W. P. Simpson. Brigade loss: k, 50; w, 426; am, 4 == 480. Bate's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William B. Bate: 58th Ala.. Col. Bushrod Jones; 37th Ga., Col. A. F. Rudler (w), Lieut.-Col. Joseph T. Smith; 4th Ga. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Maj. T. D. Caswell (w), Capt. B. M. Turner (w),
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
l. John C. Carter; 51st and 52d Tenn., Lieut.-Col. John G. Hall. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 11==12. Artillery Battalion, Maj. M. Smith: Ala. Battery, Capt. W. H. Fowler; Fla. Battery, Capt. Robert P. McCants; Ga. Battery, Capt. John Scogin; Miss. Battery, Capt. W. B. Turner. Battalion loss: m, 7. Stevenson's division, Maj.-Gen. Carter L. Stevenson, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown (temporarily). Brown's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown: 3d Tenn., Col. C. H. Walker; 18th and 26th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. W. R. Butler; 32d Tenn., Maj. J. P. McGuire; 45th Tenn. and 23d Tenn. Battalion, Col. A. Searcy. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 35; m, 13==50. Pettus's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. W. Pettus: 20th Ala., Capt. John W. Davis; 23d Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. B. Bibb; 30th Ala., Col. C. M. Shelley; 31st Ala., Col. D. R. Hundley; 46th Ala., Capt. George E. Brewer. Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 93; m, 17==127. Cumming's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Cumming: 34th Ga., Col. J. A. W. Johnson (w), Lieut.-Col. J. W. Bradley; 36th Ga