hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Daniel Butterfield or search for Daniel Butterfield in all documents.

Your search returned 65 results in 7 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
on duty with those corps. This places General Butterfield in command of Porter's corps. General General Butterfield is my junior, and I am his only senior on duty with this army. I thought that both Stoal who is affected by the giving a corps to Butterfield. I saw to-day Franklin and Baldy Smith, whI presume you understand the question. General Butterfield does not command me, but his command be the object of my visit to headquarters, as Butterfield is in Hooker's grand division, and I found hat moment perfectly ignorant that I ranked Butterfield; that he agreed with me in all I said; thatather have me in command of the corps; that Butterfield's assignment was only temporary; that he woat he was not aware of the relative rank of Butterfield and myself; indeed, that it was only withinthat I had become apprised of the fact that Butterfield had the corps, and that I was his only senio give me the Fifth Corps, now commanded by Butterfield. I told him, in that case I did not want t
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
Hold your column ready to move. Very respectfully, etc., Daniel Butterfield, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. your movement, and the cavalry. Very respectfully, etc., Daniel Butterfield, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. nd Union Bridge, as ordered. Very respectfully, etc., Daniel. Butterfield, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. G. only partial information afforded him by Generals Pleasanton and Butterfield, chief of staff, the commanding general became a party to an act of the enemy's shells exploded, a fragment of which struck General Butterfield, the chief of staff, who immediately left the field and did waiting developments, had been issued by his chief of staff, General Butterfield, without his authority. Officers were immediately sent, whoormation on which to predicate action. On the 5th Major-General Daniel Butterfield, chief of staff, was relieved from duty with the army
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
that Hooker planned the campaign of Gettysburg, and that Butterfield wrote all the orders for the movements, in accordance wiich has worried me a great deal. It is now evident that Butterfield, either intentionally or otherwise, misconstrued somethi the enemy might compel me so to do, and I may have told Butterfield to familiarize himself with the roads, etc., so that if te of the battle, make me heartsick. I believe now that Butterfield commenced deliberately, from the time I assumed command, am to suffer from the malice of such men as Sickles and Butterfield. Grant is expected here next Wednesday. He spoke verosed to interfere with my army in any details. I hear Butterfield is in Washington, and is going to swear that I told him s order was not authorized by me, and that it was due to Butterfield's own fears. I understand the Secretary is very indignaed was entirely the work of Grant and Stanton. I hear Butterfield has been swearing terribly against me. I shall go up day
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
burg. Hold your column ready to move. Daniel Butterfield, Major General, Chief of Staff. Headquatminster and Union Bridge, as ordered. Daniel Butterfield, Major General, Chief of Staff. Headquaindulging in the utmost charity towards General Butterfield, and believing that he is sincere in whnear and confidential to me as that of General Butterfield, who, if I had any such intention, or h what directions they ran. My orders to General Butterfield were similar to this: General ButterGeneral Butterfield, neither I nor any man can tell what the results of this day's operations may be. It is our daddressed to General Slocum, written by General Butterfield himself, directing him to make an attacrmation of what I consider my orders to General Butterfield. It is as follows: Headquarters armysubstance of the instructions I gave to General Butterfield, to familiarize himself with the positiendent upon the result of that. That General Butterfield may have misapprehended what I said to [6 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 31 (search)
he morning of the 2nd he directed his Chief of Staff, Gen. Butterfield, to study and mark out the lines of retreat. It was tion which I have for asserting it is the evidence of Gen. Butterfield before the Committee on the Conduct of the War. He then assumes that Gen. Butterfield had a grievance: that he had been displaced as Chief of Staff to Gen. Meade, and had made up this story to injure the latter. Gen. Butterfield is fully capable of taking care of his own reputation. As, however, hepersonal friend is always selected for the position. Gen. Butterfield, who had been chosen for this duty by Gen. Hooker, nehe was not continued in office. Mr. Swinton says that Butterfield's evidence is not confirmed by any other member of the c not questioned as to the specific language quoted by Gen. Butterfield, and no subordinate will volunteer information which curred at the council. The following letter sustains Gen. Butterfield's statement in its essential particulars: No. 465 C
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
me between 9.30 A. M. and 4 P. M. which General Butterfield, in his testimony before the Committee , denied emphatically ever having given General Butterfield any such instructions, and showed so co adopt, who does not hesitate to accept General Butterfield's statement on almost every other pointrals Sedgwick, Hancock, Birney, Gibbon, and Butterfield were before that Committee. While Generaly, excepting Generals Hancock, Howard, and Butterfield, present as chief-of-staff. It remains, thncil. General Meade being present, and General Butterfield questioning the members whether we shou the existing condition of affairs, and General Butterfield, who was then chief-of-staff, read the , and excepting that of Generals Slocum and Butterfield, it is adverse to the charge of General Douade to come to the conclusion to retain General Butterfield, General Hooker's chief-of-staff, tempoWilliams; and in sorry contrast, Doubleday, Butterfield, and Pleasonton. It is high time that disp[5 more...]
96. Burnside, Ambrose E., I, 196, 242, 243, 245, 303, 304, 309, 322, 323, 325-329, 331-335, 338-342, 344-352, 354, 358-362, 365-367, 384; II, 161, 163, 217-222, 234, 253, 254, 261, 262, 266, 267, 322, 344-349. Burnside, Mrs. Ambrose E., I, 358. Bustamente, Gen., I, 88. Butler, Anthony, I, 4. Butler, Benjamin F., II, 196, 204, 214, 226, 231-233,239-241,247, 248, 253,255, 256, 342, 343. Butler, Margaret Coats, I, 4. Butler, W. O., I, 130, 153, 165, 168, 173, 233. Butterfield, Daniel, I, 329, 332, 339, 341, 342, 351, 352, 354; II, 37, 38, 40, 71, 108, 123, 125, 164, 181-183, 185-188, 249, 318-320, 326, 337, 340, 352, 361, 389, 390-395, 397, 398, 403, 408, 409, 416-420, 422. C Cadwalader, Gen., I, 8, 355, 376, 378, 381. Cadwalader, Charles E., I, 220, 384; II, 209, 394. Cadwalader, John, I, 113; II, 191. Cadwaladers, I, 3. Caesar, I, 352. Caldwell, John C., I, 293; II, 65, 69, 77, 86, 89, 100. Calef, J. H., II, 32. Camac, Thomas, I, 8.