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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Butterfield or search for Butterfield in all documents.

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pulse or capture it. But word had gone to Gen. Butterfield, who speedily ordered the Seventeenth Newe appearance of so strong a reenforcement. Butterfield threw the Eighty-third Pennsylvania and Six timely efforts of the brave regiments from Butterfield and McQuade, who drove from the ground a fothe whole of ours engaged at any one time. Butterfield's efforts, from first to last, were productevealed his position. The word came from Gen. Butterfield to advance, and forward out of those woodhree rousing cheers from the regiments as Gen. Butterfield rode along the line, and thanked us for tn's battery were unlimbering. Here again Gen. Butterfield appeared, and calling for a horse, shouteo bivouac on the field. The next morning Butterfield's brigade turned into the guard over two huDid you see that? asked an aid. I see that Butterfield is driving them handsomely, was the quiet rrdially and congratulated him. Turning to Gen. Butterfield, who was near, he put one hand on his sho[4 more...]
Friday morning, Gen. McCall had fallen back in the rear of Gaines's Mill, and in front of Woodbury's Bridge, where he was posted, his left joining the right of Butterfield's brigade, resting in the woods and near the swamps of the Chickahominy. Morell was on his right, in the centre, and Gen. Sykes, commanding five thousand regulur and a half, our left line withstood this terrible shock of battle. Brigade after brigade of the enemy was hurled against our devoted, daring, dying heroes. Butterfield, with hat in hand, rallied, cheered and led his men forward again and again. Though decimated at every discharge, losing heavily in officers, and with an overwhad again signalized himself for heroic bravery, as the senior officer in command. A part of the brigade had been withdrawn by the right flank, and with them Gen. Butterfield, who, notwithstanding the thousand dangers that he risked, escaped unharmed, one bullet having passed through the rim of his hat, and another bent his sword
lexandria and Warrenton turnpike. We remained in this position about three hours, when I received orders to advance the line, which was promptly done. To effect this, it was necessary to drive the enemy from some houses in front of our left. This was gallantly done by three companies, under the command of Lieut. Sheridan, with the loss of two men killed and three wounded. Our line of skirmishers were then marched with those of the Pennsylvania reserves, the Bucktails on our left, and Gen. Butterfield's on the right. At about half-past 4 P. M. the attack was made by our troops on the right, and a short time after a movement was observed on our left, among the skirmishers of the Pennsylvania reserve, which ended in their retiring entirely from their position. This was immediately reported to Gen. Sykes, who directed me to occupy the same ground with my skirmishers, which was accordingly done. The skirmishers of the Third infantry then occupied all the open ground in front, extend
lexandria and Warrenton turnpike. We remained in this position about three hours, when I received orders to advance the line, which was promptly done. To effect this, it was necessary to drive the enemy from some houses in front of our left. This was gallantly done by three companies, under the command of Lieut. Sheridan, with the loss of two men killed and three wounded. Our line of skirmishers were then marched with those of the Pennsylvania reserves, the Bucktails on our left, and Gen. Butterfield's on the right. At about half-past 4 P. M. the attack was made by our troops on the right, and a short time after a movement was observed on our left, among the skirmishers of the Pennsylvania reserve, which ended in their retiring entirely from their position. This was immediately reported to Gen. Sykes, who directed me to occupy the same ground with my skirmishers, which was accordingly done. The skirmishers of the Third infantry then occupied all the open ground in front, extend