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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Daniel Butterfield or search for Daniel Butterfield in all documents.

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dvance. On arriving at the west fork of the Chickamauga River, it was found that the enemy had destroyed the bridge. To provide for this contingency, Major-General Butterfield, my Chief of Staff, had in the morning prudently requested that three pontoons, with their calks and chesses, might be despatched for my use, but as they fire at Lookout and Ringgold elicited universal admiration. To my staff more than ever am I indebted for the assistance rendered upon this occasion. Major-General Butterfield, Chief of Staff, always useful in counsel, was untiring and devoted on the field. Captain H. W. Perkins, Assistant Adjutant-General, Colonel James D. Fenly, where the lines will be formed. Pursueno further than the rest until further orders. The bridges are to be made perfect after the troops have passed. Daniel Butterfield, Major-General and Chief of Staff. This, he said, he was to obey. This order I did not see or know of until after my command had driven the enemy beyo
until he had reported to General Meade, remarking, however, that he (General Sickles) would doubtless receive orders immediately. Two P. M. came, and yet no orders. Why was this? Other orders than those expected by General Sickles were, it appears, in preparation at headquarters. It has since been stated, upon unquestionable authority, that General Meade had decided upon a retreat, and that an order to withdraw from the position held by our army was penned by his Chief of Staff, General Butterfield, though happily its promulgation never took place. This order is probably on record in the Adjutant-General's office. Meanwhile the enemy's columns were moving rapidly around to our left and rear. These facts were again reported to headquarters, but brought no response. Buford's cavalry had been massed on the left, covering that flank with outposts, and videttes were thrown forward on the Emmetsburgh Road. While awaiting the expected orders, Sickles made good use of his time in
he north to Canton, where I left the army yesterday, in splendid condition. I will leave it there five days, in hopes the cavalry from Memphis will turn up there. I will have them come in. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. Despatch from General Butterfield. Major-General Butterfield, under date of Cairo, March eleventh, addressed the following to Lieutenant-General Grant or General Halleck: General Sherman arrived yesterday at Memphis. His command is all safe. Our total loss in killeMajor-General Butterfield, under date of Cairo, March eleventh, addressed the following to Lieutenant-General Grant or General Halleck: General Sherman arrived yesterday at Memphis. His command is all safe. Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing is one hundred and seventy only. The general result of his expedition, including Smith's and the Yazoo River movements, are about as follows: One hundred and fifty miles of railroad, sixty-seven bridges, seven thousand feet of trestle, twenty locomotives, twenty-eight cars, ten thousand bales of cotton, several steam-mills, and over two — million bushels of corn were destroyed. The railroad destruction is complete and thorough. The capture of prisoners exceeds all l