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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
ean Paul, and Matthias Claudius. She describes the sense of intellectual freedom derived from these studies as half delightful, half alarming. Mr. Ward one day had undertaken to read an English translation of Faust and came to her in great alarm. My daughter, he said, I hope that you have not read this wicked book! She had read it, and Wilhelm Meister, too (though in later life she thought the latter not altogether good reading for the youth of our country ). Shelley was forbidden, and Byron allowed only in small and carefully selected doses. The twofold bereavement which weighed so heavily upon her checked for a time the development of her thought, throwing her back on the ideas which her childhood had received without question; but her buoyant spirit could not remain long submerged, and as the poignancy of grief abated, her mind sought eagerly for clearer vision. In the quiet of her own room, the bounds of thought and of faith stretched wide and wider. Vision often came
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
ry remarkable work, and one which ought to remain in this country. February 11. Dreamed of an interview with a female pope. I had to go to Alliance Meeting to speak about Wordsworth. I hunted up some verses written about him in my early enthusiasm, probably in 1840 or 1841. This I read and then told of my visit to him with Dr. Howe and the unpleasantness of the experience. Spoke also of the reaction in England against the morbid discontent which is so prominent and powerful in much of Byron's poetry.... February 12. ... In my dream of yesterday morning the woman pope and I were on very friendly terms. I asked on leaving whether I might kiss her hand. She said, You may kiss my hand. I found it fat and far from beautiful. As I left her, methought that her countenance relaxed and she looked like a tired old woman. In my dream I thought, How like this is to what Pope Leo would do. February 13.... Felt greatly discouraged at first waking. It seemed impossible for me to m
Bryant, W. C., I, 209, 304; II, 197, 198. Bryce, James, II, 168. Buck, Florence, I, 391. Buffalo, I, 376; II, 90, 139. Buller, Charles, I, 82. Bullock, A. H., I, 249. Bulwer-Lytton, E., I, 262; II, 206. Burne-Jones, Mrs. E., II, 169. Burns, Robert, I, 139. Burr, Mrs., II, 130. Burt, Mr., II, 248. Busoni, Sig., II, 192. Butcher, S. H., II, 323. Butler, Josephine, II, 21. Butler, W. A., II, 248, 306. Butterworth, Hezekiah, II, 228, 270. Byron, G. Gordon, Lord, I, 68; II, 296. Cable, G. W., II, 87. Cabot, Elliot, II, 363. Caine, Hall, II, 243, 248, 250. Cairo, II, 34, 35, 36, 182. California, II, 131, 135, 154. Calypso, I, 272. Cambridge Club, II, 66. Campagna, I, 95, 134. Campanari, Sig., II, 270. Campbell, Dudley, II, 8. Campello, Count Salome di, II, 273, 285, 302. Cardini, Sig., I, 43, 44. Carignan, Prince de, II, 31. Carlisle, Lady, I, 85, 87; II, 166. Carlisle, G. W. F. Howard, Earl of, I,