hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 5 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
the lines To a waterfowl, and The Prairies alike reveal the spirit of inland discovery. The relation of English poets to American observers is most significant of all. Coleridge praises Cartwright, Heame, and Bartram; the impression which Bartram had left on his mind, says his grandson, was deep and lasting. Lamb is enamoured of pious John Woolman, and eventually favours Crevecoeur, yielding to Hazlitt's recommendation. Southey commends Dwight, and employs Bartram in Madoc. In Mazeppa, Byron, an inveterate reader of travels, takes the notion of an audible aurora borealis from Heame. But the most striking instance is Wordsworth. Commonly supposed to have refrained from describing what he had not seen with the bodily eye, and to have read little save his own poetry, he was in fact a systematic student in the field of travel and observation, for the ends of poetical composition. Accordingly, he writes to Archdeacon Wrangham, perhaps in 181I: You inquire about old books; you mig
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
eigh Hunt, whom in several ways he certainly resembled, but he was not, like Hunt, an omnivorous reader. The social sense was stronger in him than literary instinct; the merits of his best work are the merits of lively chat. During his European wanderings he learned more from men than from books, and from women most of all. His Diotima was Lady Blessington, whose literary dinners and soirees were duly, in The New York Mirror, dashed at by his free pencil. At Gore House he heard gossip of Byron, saw D'Israeli in action, and met Rogers, Procter, Moore, and Bulwer, men of letters and men of the world. After such models Willis shaped his own career. He luxuriated in drawing-rooms and shone at dinners, The topmost bright bubble on the wave of The Town. With his rapid glances into the kaleidoscope of society he combined — for his readers-views of famous places, anecdotes of travel, reflections by the way, descriptions of scenery, and observations on customs and characters, in all
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
n verse and politics that was to be lifelong. Byron's voice is audible in the Spenserian stanzas aode Island coal and a mosquito, are less after Byron than after the town wit Halleck and his coteriere are new revelations and new instruments in Byron, Tennyson, and Browning; indeed, Keats in the done with the spell and the uncanny, and what Byron with the crime and the movement — the two poetnized. It is often as if the personalities of Byron, Shelley, Wordsworth, Moore, and Bryant had berate the now dead but once potent influence of Byron on our minor poets, even on poets utterly unlike Byron in temperament and in mode of life. See Leonard, W. E., Byron and Byronism in America (Byron and Byronism in America (Columbia Univ. Diss.), 1905. Yet Willis was a true poet in a half dozen lyrics where a human form,he still popular Marco Bozzaris reminds one of Byron in the enthusiasm for Greek freedom (also the oems grave and gay are whimsically mixed after Byron's later manner. Indeed Byron, whose works Hal[9 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
er on other models. John Neal (1793-1870), a native of Maine, was in Baltimore when The spy appeared, engaged in the production of four long novels in six or seven months. Full of a history of the Revolution on which he had been working, he was fired by Cooper's example to write Seventy-Six (1823) with incredible rapidity. The work, however, is little more like Cooper than the three which had preceded it, Logan (1822), Randolph (1823), and Errata (1823). In all these Neal's real master was Byron, whom he followed with a fury of rant and fustian which would have made him, had he been gifted with taste and humour as well, no mean follower. Three years spent in England as a writer on American topics, where he became one of Bentham's secretaries and a utilitarian in all but atheism, modified Neal somewhat so that in his long later career he seemed almost a man of sense if never a man of humour or taste. Brother Jonathan (1825) and The down-easters (1833), however, which promise at fir
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byronism in America, 280 n. C Caius Marius, 222 Calavar, 319 CalaynosByron and Byronism in America, 280 n. C Caius Marius, 222 Calavar, 319 Calaynos, 222, 223 n. Caleb Williams, 288, 290 Calef, Robert, 55 Calvert, Sir, George, 4 Calvin, 36, 39, 66, 67, 71, 83 Campaign, 159 Campbell, George, 229 Campbell, Thomas, 183, 282 Candid examination of the neutral claims of great Britain and the colonies, a, 138 Captain Barney's victory over the General monk, 183 dney, Letters of, 148 Sylvester, Joshua, 154, 155, 158 T Table talk, 194 Tablet, 234 Tale of a Tub, a, 112, 118 Tale of Cloudland, a, 273 Tales (Byron), 280 Tales of a traveller, 246, 256 Tales of the border, 318 Tales of the Glauber Spa, 278 n. Talisman, the, 240 Taller, I 115, I 16 Tears and Smi