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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
f his death, in 1860, I think he gave in college the largest promise of future eminence; mingled, however, with uncertainty whether the waywardness of genius might not betray him. None then imagined that the fiery nature, nursed upon the study of Byron, and delighting always to talk of his poetry and life, would be tamed to the modest ways which he afterwards adopted. The danger seemed to be, that, like his prototype, he would break loose from social life, and follow the bent of lawless ambitipetitors were required to read their dissertations in the chapel before the students and officers. Sumner read his in the usual indifferent way, very rapidly, and omitting the greater part. He invested his prize-money in books, among which were Byron's Poems, the Pilgrim's Progress, Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, Hazlitt's Select British Poets, and Harvey's Shakspeare. The last two were kept during life on his desk or table, ready for use; and the Shakspeare was found open on the day of his
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
Persius; in poetry and general literature, Shakspeare and Milton, Finished, Oct. 12. Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, The Correspondence of Gilbert Wakefield with Charles James Fox, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays; and, in history, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe. He copied at great length into his commonplace-book—soon after laid aside—the narrations and reflections of these historians. He read both the Lorenzo de Me but his radical notions were under the control of good sense. The two friends discussed political topics, like Masonry, and the public men of the day; literary themes, like the characters of Shakspeare, Milton's poetry, and Moore's Biography of Byron; Hallam's History of the Middle Ages, and the historical characters of Francis I. and Charles V. They criticised for mutual improvement each other's style of writing so plainly and unreservedly, that only their assured confidence in each other's
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
d to the conquest of England. Their waves dash now with the same foamy crests as when these two conquerors timidly entrusted themselves to their bosom. Civilization, in the mean time, with its attendant servants—commerce, printing, and Christianity—has been working changes in the two countries on either side; so that Caesar and William, could they revisit the earth, might not recognize the lands from which they passed, or which they subdued. The sea receives no impress from man. This idea Byron has expanded in some of the most beautiful stanzas he has written in the Childe Harold. On Christmas Day, besides writing in his journal, he wrote letters to Hillard and Judge Story. To Hillard he wrote: It is now seventeen days, and I am without news of you and your affairs, and of all our common friends; and I feel sad to think that many more days will elapse before I shall hear from you. When you write, dwell on all particulars; tell me about all my friends, give me every turn of the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
to abandon the great seal. Dr. Lushington also spoke of him in the highest terms, as did the Attorney-General. When I pressed Lushington into a comparison of Cottenham with Brougham, he evidently gave the former the preference. Lushington Stephen Lushington, 1782-1873. He served in Parliament from 1817 to 1841, advocated the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade; was one of Queen Caroline's counsel, and was appointed Judge of the Admiralty and a Privy Councillor in 1838. He was Lady Byron's counsel in her domestic difficulties. Sumner visited him in July, 1857, at Ockham Park, in Surrey. himself is a great man; one of the ablest men in England. I owe his acquaintance to the Attorney-General. Dr. L. told me that Brougham, when Chancellor, nearly killed himself and all his bar; that, during the passage of the Reform Bill in the Commons, he sat in the Lords from ten o'clock in the forenoon till ten at night; and Lushington was in constant attendance here, and was obliged to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
st Bishop of Llandaff, and then of Winchester; resigning his see in 1869, which he had held forty-one years. with Gally Knight, Henry Gally (or Galley) Knight, 1788-1846; poet and traveller, member of Parliament; referred to in Moore's Life of Byron (London: 1860), pp. 60, 218, 245. the old college friend of Byron, and with Dr. Buckland; William Buckland, 1784-1856; professor at Oxford, and Dean of Westminster; distinguished for his studies in geology and mineralogy. He invited Sumner toByron, and with Dr. Buckland; William Buckland, 1784-1856; professor at Oxford, and Dean of Westminster; distinguished for his studies in geology and mineralogy. He invited Sumner to dine with the Geological Society Club, Dec. 19, 1838, at the Crown and Anchor Hotel. but those venerable walls were more interesting, by far, than all that these men could say. And I remember no feast so rich in elevated pleasure,—not those where the contributions of wit and learning have outdone the meats, outdone the frolic wine. Let me say, however, that York did not produce this fine effect. I saw it on a rainy day, and with my mind full of my journey to the South. Boston, Oct. 29. N