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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
dially that I felt almost at home with him. While I was there, Lady Byron came in. She is pretty, not beautiful,—for the prevalent expressito see Lord Byron. He was busy when I first went in, and I found Lady Byron alone. She did not seem so pretty to me as she did the other day this morning with Lord Byron. When I first went in, I again met Lady Byron, and had a very pleasant conversation with her until her carriagemations of her powers of acting. She formed a singular figure by Lady Byron, who sat by her side, all grace and delicacy, and this showed Mrse box. . . . . There was nobody there, this evening, but Lord and Lady Byron, and her father and mother. It was indeed only a very pleasant pthe Monk, and the Castle Spectre. Lord Byron was pleasant, and Lady Byron more interesting than I have yet seen her. Lord Byron told me onee in conversation. Fas est et ab hoste doceri. Lady Milbank, Lady Byron's mother, is a good-natured old lady,— a little fashionable, howe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
ascending the Oronoco. They are now in all respects so different that I hardly think they will ever undertake the expedition. When I happened to tell Lord Byron that Goethe had many personal enemies in Germany, he expressed a kind of interest to know more about it that looked extremely like Shylock's satisfaction that other men have ill luck too; and when I added the story of the translation of the whole of a very unfair Edinburgh review into German, directly under Goethe's nose at Jena, Byron discovered at first a singular eagerness to hear it, and then, suddenly checking himself, said, as if half in earnest, though still laughing, And yet I don't know what sympathy I can have with Goethe, unless it be that of an injured author. This was the truth, but it was evidently a little more than sympathy he felt. In the whole I stayed an hour and a half with them, and Lord Byron asked me to spend some days,—an invitation I, of course, felt no inclination to accept, in his present ci
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
easant, a little over-nice both in his manner and choice of words and subjects, witty, even, sometimes; but, though full of fresh knowledge from Africa, by no means so interesting as Rogers. July 14.—I went this morning by appointment to see Lady Byron. . . . . The upper part of her face is still fresh and young; the lower part bears strong marks of suffering and sorrow. Her whole manner is very gentle and quiet,—not reserved, but retiring,—and there are sure indications in it of deep feelinch interested in doing good, and seemed anxious about a school she has established, to support, as well as educate, a number of poor boys, so as to fit them to be teachers. Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor visited this school at Ealing, by the desire of Lady Byron, and were pleased especially with seeing how much can be done by a moderate sum of money, judiciously expended. She talked well, and once or twice was amused, and laughed; but it was plain that she has little tendency to gayety. Indeed, she ha<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
his grand establishment, given out of respect to his wife's rare merits. She is the daughter of one of the Fairfax family, a branch of which is in Virginia,—Lord Fairfax, Washington's friend, was of the same family,—a little, small, quiet, kindly person of about fifty, with a voice soft, gentle, and low, ever an excellent thing in woman; a good mother, who has educated her family herself, and done it well and successfully; a good wife, managing her household judiciously; a good friend, as Lady Byron knows, to whose daughter, Lady King, she has been of great practical use; a domestic person, yet receiving and enjoying a great deal of the best scientific and literary society, and frequenting occasionally the most exclusive and fashionable; skilled in the modern languages, two of which she speaks fluently; painting beautifully in oil-colors, of which we saw many specimens; and one of the most extraordinary mathematicians alive, of whom all the rest speak with the greatest kindness and ad
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
ther countries, so that, among their other accomplishments, they all talk good English. . . . We joined the family at tea, in a small, pleasant sort of boudoir, formed in the projecting tower of the castle, which almost overhangs the Elbe, commanding very grand and beautiful views up and down the river. The conversation was very agreeable. Mr. Noel, an Englishman of about five-and-thirty, quite well known in Austria and Saxony for his talents and philanthropy, and a near connection of Lady Byron, is an inmate of the family, and talks extremely well. He is a great admirer of Dr. Channing, as is also Count Leo, the third son of Count Thun, who has translated the Essay on Bonaparte, and was prevented from printing it only by the publication of another translation. It is a curious circumstance, which rendered our conversation more interesting. . . . June 6.—The castle bell rang at five this morning for prayers, and again for mass at half past 8, in the chapel; but it was at such
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
ombelles, Count H., 246, 247. Bonaparte, Christine (Countess Posse), 182, 183 note, 446 Bonaparte, Emperor Napoleon I., return from Elba, 49; Dr. Parr on, 50; Byron's feeling for, 60; anecdotes of, 61, 123. Bonaparte, Jerome, King of Westphalia, 83, 84, 111. Bonaparte, Letizia (Madame Mere), 181. Bonaparte, Louis, 181n, Carl Josias, 177, 178. Burgess, Sir, James Bland, 60, 62. Burr, Aaron, Talleyrand's opinion of, 261. Bussierre, Baron de, 464, 470. Buttini, Dr., 154. Byron, Lady, 60, 63, 66, 67, 68, 410 and note, 448. Byron, Lord, 54, 58, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 66-68; anecdote of, 110, 114, 165, 166, 411, 446. C Caballero Fern an,Byron, Lord, 54, 58, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 66-68; anecdote of, 110, 114, 165, 166, 411, 446. C Caballero Fern an, pseud., 236 note. Cabot, George, 12, 13, 14, 396. Cadaval, Duchess de, 249. Cadiz, 193; visits, 236. Calasanzios Convent, 195. Calhoun, John C., 349, 381. Cambridge, England, visits, 270, 271. Camoens, 244, 252. Campagna of Rome, 168. Campbell, Sir, John, 245, 246. Campbell, Thomas, 62, 63, 65, 282, 410. Can