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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VI (search)
nce in our Eastern States. This literary material was strung loosely upon a plot wild and improbable enough for Brockden Brown, and yet vivid enough to retain a certain charm, for me at least, even until this day. It was this plot, perhaps, which led the late James T. Fields to maintain that Maturin was the author of the novel in question; but it is now known to have been the production of Horace Binney Wallace of Philadelphia, then a youth of twenty-one. In this book occurs the sentence: Byron's European fame is the best earnest of his immortality, for a foreign nation is a kind of contemporaneous posterity. II. 89. Few widely quoted phrases have had, I fancy, less foundation. It is convenient to imagine that an ocean or a mountain barrier, or even a line of custom houses, may furnish a sieve that shall sift all true reputations from the chaff; but in fact, I suspect, whatever whims may vary or unsettle immediate reputations on the spot, these disturbing influences are onl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, X (search)
t to utter his own sympathies, he must also reach those of his audience. The audience, he thinks, is often like some hungry Bedouin Arab in the desert, who thinks he has found a sack of pease and opens it eagerly; but, alas! they are only pearls! With what discontent did the audience of Emerson's day inspect his precious stones! Even now Matthew Arnold shakes his head over them and finds Longfellow's little sentimental poem of The Bridge worth the whole of Emerson. When we consider that Byron once accepted meekly his own alleged inferiority to Rogers, and that Southey ranked himself with Milton and Virgil, and only with half-reluctant modesty placed himself below Homer; that Miss Anna Seward and her contemporaries habitually spoke of Hayley as the Mighty Bard, and passed over without notice Hayley's eccentric dependant, William Blake; that but two volumes of Thoreau's writings were published, greatly to his financial loss, during his lifetime, and eight others, with four biograp
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXI (search)
f sympathy for Moore and his Irish Melodies simply shows the diminished hold of the sentimental upon us, taking that word to represent a certain rather melodramatic self-consciousness, a tender introspection in the region of the heart, a kind of studious cosseting of one's finer feelings. Perhaps it is not generally recognized how much more abundant was this sort of thing forty years ago than now, and how it moulded the very temperaments of those who were born into it, and grew up under it. Byron had as much to do with creating it as any one in England; but more probably it goes back to Rousseau in France; hardly, I should think to Petrarch, to whom Lowell is disposed to attribute it, and who certainly exerted very little influence in the way of sentimentality on his friend Chaucer. But the Byronic atmosphere certainly spread to Germany, as may be seen by the place conceded to that poet in Goethe's Faust; although Goethe's Werther, and Schiller's Die Rauber showed that the tendency
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXIII (search)
aring, it is rather a substitute for it. When Matthew Arnold, at the outset of his paper on Emerson, proposes that we should pull ourselves together to examine him, he says crudely what might have been more forcibly conveyed by a finer touch. When Mr. Gosse, in one of his Forum papers, answers an objection with A fiddlestick's end for such a theory! it does not give an impression of vigor, or of what he calls, in case of Dryden, a virile tramp, but rather suggests that humbler hero of whom Byron records that— He knew not what to say, and so he swore. The fact that Mr. Arnold and Mr. Gosse have both made good criticisms on others does not necessarily indicate that they practise as they preach. To come back once more to the incomparable Joubert, we often find a good ear perfectly compatible with a false note. Que de gens, en litterature, ont l'oreille juste, et chantent faux! It is never worth while to dwell much upon international comparisons; it is enough to say that the o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXVI (search)
had tasted fame more promptly than his greater contemporaries, and liked the taste so well that he held his own poems far superior to those of Wordsworth, and wrote of them, With Virgil, with Tasso, with Homer, there are fair grounds of comparison. Then followed a period during which the long shades of oblivion seemed to have closed over the author of Madoc and Kehama. Behold! in 1886 the Pall Mall Gazette, revising through the best critics Sir James Lubbock's Hundred Best Books, dethrones Byron, Shelley, Coleridge, Lamb, and Landor; omits them all, and reinstates the forgotten Southey once more. Is this the final award of fate? No: it is simply the inevitable swing of the pendulum. Southey, it would seem, is to have two innings; perhaps one day it will yet be Hayley's turn. Would it please you very much, asks Warrington of Pendennis, to have been the author of Hayley's verse? Yet Hayley was, in his day, as Southey testifies, by popular election the king of the English poets
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
onaparte, Napoleon, 28, 52, 109, 188, 234. Book catalogue, a Westminster Abbey, 152. Boston, the, of Emerson's day, 62. Boyesen, H. H., 144, 171. Bremer, Fredrika, 57. Bridaine, Jacques, 215. Brougham, Henry, 224. Brown, Charles Brockden, 51. Brown, John, 16, 155. Brown, J. Brownlee, 104. Browning, Robert, 25, 54, 55, 98, 196. Bryant, W. C., 100, 147. Bryce, James, 120, 167, 211. Bulwer, see Lytton. Buntline, Ned, 199, 200. Burroughs, John, 114. Burton, Robert, 114. Byron, Lord, 178, 195, 217. C. Cable, G. W., 11, 67. Cabot, J. E., 175. Calderon, Serafin, 229, 232. Carlyle, Thomas, 37, 56, 197, 206, 217. Casanova, Jacques, 41. Catullus, 99. Cervantes, Miguel de, 229. Champlain, Samuel de, 192. Channing, E. T., 94 Channing, Walter, 214. Channing, W. E., 46, 66, 155. Channing, W. E. (of Concord), 103. Chaucer, Geoffrey, 179. Cherbuliez, Victor, 79. Chapelain, J., 91. Chaplin, H. W., 76. Chicago Anarchists, the, 68. Choate, Rufus, 213.