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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 1: Longfellow as a classic (search)
away, there is often visible a slight reaction, perhaps in the interest of supposed justice, when people try to convince themselves that his fame has already diminished. Such reactions have notably occurred, for instance, in the cases of Scott, Byron, Wordsworth, and even of Burns, yet without visible or permanent results, while the weaker fame of Southey or of Campbell has yielded to them. It is safe to say that up to the present moment no serious visible reaction has occurred in the case oallied. Those who grew up during the period when the Lake poets of England were still under discussion can well recall that the typical poet was long supposed to be necessarily something of a reprobate, or at any rate wild and untamable; so that Byron and Shelley gained in fame by the supposition that the domestic and law-abiding gifts were far from them. The prominence of Wordsworth was developed in spite of this tradition, and even when the report cheered some of his would-be admirers that
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 7: the corner stone laid (search)
bold, original thinkers, they have imbibed the degenerate spirit of modern English poetry. North American Review, XXXIV. 74,75. What is meant by this last passage is seen when he goes on to point out that each little village then had its little Byron, its self-tormenting scoffer at morality, its gloomy misanthropist in song, and that even Wordsworth, in some respects an antidote to Byron, was as yet a very unsafe model for imitation; and he farther points out how invariably those who have imiByron, was as yet a very unsafe model for imitation; and he farther points out how invariably those who have imitated him have fallen into tedious mannerisms. He ends with a moral, perhaps rather tamely stated: We hope, however, that ere long some one of our most gifted bards will throw his fetters off, and relying on himself alone, fathom the recesses of his own mind, and bring up rich pearls from the secret depths of thought. lb. 78. The true glory of a nation—this is his final attitude—is moral and intellectual preeminence; thus distinctly foreshadowing the title of his friend Charles Sumner's l
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 24: Longfellow as a man (search)
low's appearance, I should compare him to the ideal representations of early Christian saints and prophets. There is a kind of halo of goodness about him, a benignity in his expression which one associates with St. John at Patmos saying to his followers and brethren, Little children, love one another! . . . Longfellow has had the rare fortune of being thoroughly appreciated in his own country and in other countries during his lifetime; how different, probably, would have been the career of Byron, of Keats, or of Shelley, had it been thus with them! It would be presumptuous for me, and out of place, to do more here than allude to the universal popularity of Longfellow's works wherever English is spoken; I believe it is not an exaggeration to say that his works are more popular than those of any other living poet. What child is there who has not heard of Excelsior, or of Evangeline, of Miles Standish, or of Hiawatha ? What songs more popular than The Bridge, and I know a maiden fair
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
fellow a student of, 272, 273. Brownson, Orestes A., 125. Bruges, 161. Brunswick, Me., 18, 64, 69, 82, 100, 163. Bryant, William C., 8, 23, 60, 62, 64, 80, 112, 142, 265, 294; his early poems compared with Longfellow's, 24-26; moralizing of, 133, 134; indifferent to Longfellow, 145; his Selections from the American Poets, mentioned, 145. Bull, Ole, 214, 215. Burns, Robert, 7, 8, 62, 188. Bushnell, Rev., Horace, his letter to Longfellow about the Divine Tragedy, 245, 246. Byron, Lord, 7, 9, 80, 280. Cadenabbia, 223. Cadmus (ship), 46. Cambridge, Mass., 38, 40-42, 57, 75,82, 84, 116-118, 121, 139, 154, 160,169,172,179,181,182,187,192,203,205, 214, 215, 244, 272, 283, 289; Longfellow's address to the children of, 55; establishes himself in, 133; Longfellow's speech at the anniversary of, 290, 291; schools of, celebrate Longfellow's seventy-fifth birthday, 291. Cambridge Tribune, the, 117 note. Cambridge, Eng., 220, 288. Campbell, Thomas, 7, 62. Canova, An