hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 1 document section:

are of noonday in which his huge figure stands. Byron is the great pet of all young ladies and young gentlk they were anything else — that they were as unlike Byron, as they were anybody else that ever lived — that thinted with Shelley, the Guiccioli, and others, about Byron. He used to rig Shelley's boat for him, and became vll a victim. Of Shelley he speaks in high terms; of Byron exactly the reverse. Indeed, he goes so far as to sys farther, "he (Jobe) added that to his equals, he (Byron) was generous to a fault, but to his inferiors, he wopportunity offered. This may shock those who think Byron is divine, but old Jobe says so, and insists upon it with great vehemence." Now, we regard Byron, not only as the greatest poet, but decidedly the greatest ma was only one of its capabilities. So we may say of Byron. He was a great poet, because he was a great man, nosparkle, rouse and impel in the unstudied efforts of Byron. He was the best critic that has written since Horac