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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 9 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Henry Cabot or search for Henry Cabot in all documents.

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was quickly taken up by the related families,—so that through connections by kin or friendship nearly all the society was likely to take a part. For instance, the Ticknor, Eliot, Dwight, Guild, and Norton families were connected by marriage; and Mr. Eliot was a near kinsman of the Curtis family. Similar ties by blood and marriage united the Sears, Mason, Warren, Parker, and Amory families, and also the Shaw, Sturgis, Parkman, and Perkins families. Another group was the Sturgis, Perkins, Cabot, Forbes, Cary, Gardiner, and Cushing families. The different groups were often connected by kin or close friendship. Sumner was for a time, at an earlier period, shut out from one house on Beacon Street merely for complimenting, in a lawyer's office, the editor of a magazine who had reviewed a domestic controversy already before the public in judicial proceedings. The head of the family, learning the circumstance from a relative who, unobserved, was within hearing, shortly after returned a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
re. the commercial interest is disturbed by the shock that property has received. John E. Thayer, the rich broker, who has risen since your day, tells me that he regards France as a wreck. I suspect that he speaks the opinions of his class. Mr. Cabot Henry Cabot. told me that I was the first person he had seen who had hope in the future of France. I do not disguise my anxiety. France has fearful trials in store, the necessary incident of a transition state. She is moving from one houseHenry Cabot. told me that I was the first person he had seen who had hope in the future of France. I do not disguise my anxiety. France has fearful trials in store, the necessary incident of a transition state. She is moving from one house to another. Indeed, it is ignore than this,—she is fleeing from a burning house; so doing, she must feel present discomfort, but I do not doubt the future of that great country. . . . I trust that the patronage of the new government will be given directly to the people in their localities. It should not centre at Paris. If the whole apparatus is there and all the secret springs, then a mob may at any time overturn it; but if the prefects and officers of the provinces are all chosen by the p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
complete, that I do not think we could differ substantially as to the true course to be pursued if we could see each other and fully interchange opinions. To George Sumner, September 10:— On the tariff I am absolutely uncommitted. Mr. Henry Cabot, an old manufacturer, told me yesterday that he and others were now satisfied that protection was a fallacy; and that William Appleton had said that his vote could not be had for a change in the present tariff. Mr. Cabot thought the subjectMr. Cabot thought the subject would not come up in the next session. Again, September 30:— The field of our national politics is still shrouded in mist. Nobody can clearly discern the future. On the Whig side, Fillmore seems to me the most probable candidate; and on the Democratic side, Douglas. I have never thought Scott's chances good, while Webster's have always seemed insignificant. His course lately has been that of a madman. He declined to participate in any of the recent celebrations, Railroad Jubi