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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 28 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 16 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 12 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Caesar or search for Caesar in all documents.

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to Freedom, for better or for worse, and cleaving to it with a grasp never to be unloosed, it must be clear, open and unequivocal in its declarations, and must admit no other question to divert its energies. It must be all in Freedom, and, like Caesar's wife, it must be above suspicion. But besides this character which it must sustain in Massachusetts, it must be prepared to take its place in close phalanx with the united masses of the North, now organizing through all the Free States, junctad cleaving to it with a grasp never to be unloosed. While professing opposition to Slavery it also arraigns Catholics and foreigners, and allows the question of their privileges to disturb its energies. It is not all in Freedom; nor is it, like Caesar's wife, above suspicion. Besides, even as a party of Freedom, it is powerless from its isolation; for it stands by itself, and is in no way associated with that great phalanx now rallying throughout the North. In this condition should it contin
to Freedom, for better or for worse, and cleaving to it with a grasp never to be unloosed, it must be clear, open and unequivocal in its declarations, and must admit no other question to divert its energies. It must be all in Freedom, and, like Caesar's wife, it must be above suspicion. But besides this character which it must sustain in Massachusetts, it must be prepared to take its place in close phalanx with the united masses of the North, now organizing through all the Free States, junctad cleaving to it with a grasp never to be unloosed. While professing opposition to Slavery it also arraigns Catholics and foreigners, and allows the question of their privileges to disturb its energies. It is not all in Freedom; nor is it, like Caesar's wife, above suspicion. Besides, even as a party of Freedom, it is powerless from its isolation; for it stands by itself, and is in no way associated with that great phalanx now rallying throughout the North. In this condition should it contin
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
endor where they trod, While Russia's children throng to view Her holy cradle, Novgorod,— From Volga's banks, from Dwina's side, From pine-clad Ural, dark and long, Or where the foaming Terek's tide Leaps down from Kasbek, bright with song, From Altai's chain of mountain-cones, Mongolian deserts far and free, And lands that bind, through changing zones, The Eastern and the Western Sea. To every race she gives a home, And creeds and laws enjoy her shade, Till far beyond the dreams of Rome Her Caesar's mandate is obey'd. She blends the virtues they impart, And holds within her life combined The patient faith of Asia's heart, The force of Europe's restless mind. She bids the nomad's wandering cease, She binds the wild marauder fast; Her ploughshares turn to homes of peace The battle-fields of ages past. And, nobler far, she dares to know Her future's task,—nor knows in vain, But strikes at once the generous blow That makes her millions men again! So, firmer based, her power expands, No
endor where they trod, While Russia's children throng to view Her holy cradle, Novgorod,— From Volga's banks, from Dwina's side, From pine-clad Ural, dark and long, Or where the foaming Terek's tide Leaps down from Kasbek, bright with song, From Altai's chain of mountain-cones, Mongolian deserts far and free, And lands that bind, through changing zones, The Eastern and the Western Sea. To every race she gives a home, And creeds and laws enjoy her shade, Till far beyond the dreams of Rome Her Caesar's mandate is obey'd. She blends the virtues they impart, And holds within her life combined The patient faith of Asia's heart, The force of Europe's restless mind. She bids the nomad's wandering cease, She binds the wild marauder fast; Her ploughshares turn to homes of peace The battle-fields of ages past. And, nobler far, she dares to know Her future's task,—nor knows in vain, But strikes at once the generous blow That makes her millions men again! So, firmer based, her power expands, No
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section tenth: downfall of the Rebellion. (search)
ceasing to exist. The Republican party is losing its identity. Let the process be completed, and it will be no longer that Republican party which I helped to found and always served, but only a personal party; while, instead of those ideas and principles which we have been so proud to uphold, will be Presidential pretensions; and instead of Republicanism there will be nothing but Grantism. Political parties are losing their sway. Higher than party are country and the duty to save it from Caesar. The caucus is at last understood as a political engine, moved by wire-pullers; and it becomes more insupportable in proportion as directed to personal ends; nor is its character changed when called a National Convention. Here, too, are wire-pullers; and when the great Office-holder and the great Office-seeker are one and the same, it is easy to see how naturally the engine responds to the central touch. A political convention is an agency and a convenience; but never a law, least of all
ceasing to exist. The Republican party is losing its identity. Let the process be completed, and it will be no longer that Republican party which I helped to found and always served, but only a personal party; while, instead of those ideas and principles which we have been so proud to uphold, will be Presidential pretensions; and instead of Republicanism there will be nothing but Grantism. Political parties are losing their sway. Higher than party are country and the duty to save it from Caesar. The caucus is at last understood as a political engine, moved by wire-pullers; and it becomes more insupportable in proportion as directed to personal ends; nor is its character changed when called a National Convention. Here, too, are wire-pullers; and when the great Office-holder and the great Office-seeker are one and the same, it is easy to see how naturally the engine responds to the central touch. A political convention is an agency and a convenience; but never a law, least of all