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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
dinance. Courtesy to our late Confederates, he said, whether enemies or not, calls for the reasons that have actuated us. It is not true, in point of fact, that all the Northern people are hostile to the rights of the South. We have a Spartan band in every Northern State. It is due to them that they should know the reasons which influence us. The proposition was not agreed to. The following are the names of the Commissioners appointed to visit other Slave-labor States:--To Alabama, A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw; to Virginia, John S. Preston. to ask their co-operation; to propose the National Constitution just abandoned as a basis for a provisional government; and to invite the seceding States to meet South Carolina in convention at Montgomery, Alabama, on the 13th of February, 1861, for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. T
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
f partisans, without the consent of the people, delegates to a General Convention to form a confederacy independent of the old Union; and in order to carry out the bold design of the conspirators, of having that confederacy consist of the fifteen Slave-labor States, four of the conventions appointed commissioners to go to these several States, as seductive missionaries in the bad cause. The names and destination of these Commissioners were as follows:-- South Carolina.--To Alabama, A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia. James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama.--To North Carolina, Isham W Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W. Pettus; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia. Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia.--To Missouri, Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Secession of Southern States. (search)
ng the strong arm of Southern power upon the treasury and archives of the government. In order to carry out the design of the few leaders of the secession scheme to have the whole fifteen slave-labor States belong to a projected Southern Confederacy, four of the State conventions which adopted ordinances of secession appointed commissigners to go to these several States as missionaries in the cause. The names and destinations of these were as follows: South Carolina sent to Alabama A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama sent to North Carolina Isham W. Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W-Petters; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia., Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale; to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia sent to Missouri Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Senate, United States (search)
g the office of President of the United States has not been determined. the president pro tempore of the Senate receives the salary of a Vice-President, but he has no vote other than that of a Senator. Of the twenty-four Vice-Presidents, one (Calhoun) resigned; four (Gerry, King, Wilson and Hendricks) died in office; and five (Tyler, Fillmore, Johnson, Arthur, and Roosevelt) exercised the office of President of the United States during vacancies in that office occasioned by death. All of a, defended his people and arraigned those of the East in a long and able speech. Mr. Hayne's speech was delivered on Jan. 21. On the 26th, Mr. Webster replied in an argument which has become historic. Inspired by this battle of giants, Mr. Calhoun, who was then Vice-President, resigned that position that he might enter the Senate as a member, and in July next following he delivered a speech discussing not anything then before the body, but the argument delivered by Mr. Webster six month
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ship-building. (search)
stered 498 tons and carried two 8-inch guns and four 32-pounder carronades. It was now Great Britain's turn to remonstrate. All immediate necessity for increasing her navy had disappeared, and so her minister, Mr. Packenham, conveyed to Secretary Calhoun his conviction that it was by all means desirable that the convention of 1817 should be fulfilled to the letter by both contracting parties. Mr. Calhoun's reply merely refers to an enclosed note of the Secretary of the Navy, to whom he hadMr. Calhoun's reply merely refers to an enclosed note of the Secretary of the Navy, to whom he had referred Mr Packenham's communication. The reasons given by Mr. Mason. Secretary of the Navy, for our violation of the agreement were that Great Britain was violating the agreement, and that the methods of naval construction had greatly changed since 1817. On the latter point he wisely said: It is worthy of remark that at the date of the agreement between the two governments steamers were in use to a very limited extent as passenger vessels, and perhaps not at all as ships-of-war. The restr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
in water colors by a Charleston artist named Alexander. The base of the design was a mass of broken and disordered blocks of stone, on each of which were the name and arms of a free-labor State. Rising from this mass were two columns of perfect and symmetrical blocks of stone, connected by an arch of the same material, on each of which, fifteen in number, were seen the name and coat of arms of a slave-labor State. South Carolina formed the keystone of the arch, on which stood a statue of Calhoun leaning upon a trunk of a palmetto-tree, and holding a scroll bearing the words Truth, justice, and the Constitution. On each side of the statue were allegorical figures of Faith and Hope. Beyond each of these was a North American Indian with a rifle. In the space formed by the two columns and the arch was the device of the seal and flag of South Carolina—a palmetto-tree, with a rattlesnake coiled around its trunk, and at its base a park of cannon and some emblems of State commerce. On
The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Massachusetts Personal Liberty bill. (search)
to British and French ships. Another correspondent suggests cotton breastworks for Charleston. Several Banks of the interior of the State have agreed to take their respective proportions of a $400,000 State loan. Collector Colcock gives notice that all vessels from ports outside of South Carolina must enter and clear. In the Convention to-day the President announced the appointment of the following Commissioners to the slaveholding States: Florida, L. W. Spratt; Alabama, A. P. Calhoun; Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; Louisiana, Jno. L. Manning; Arkansas, A. C. Spain. Georgia and Texas are not mentioned. [Fifth Dispatch.] Charleston, Jan. 1. --The Convention yesterday passed and made public an ordinance defining and punishing treason. In addition to the already existing State law, it declares levying war against the State, adhering to its enemies, or giving them aid and comfort, shall be punished by death without the benefit of clergy. Another ordinance