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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sergeant Smith Prentiss and his career. (search)
ring back to his adopted State. His friends, and their name was legion, thought before that his talents were of the highest order, and when their judgments were thus confirmed—when they received the endorsements of such men as Clay, Webster and Calhoun, they felt a kind of personal interest in him; he was their Prentiss. They had first discovered him—first brought him out—first proclaimed his greatness. Their excitement knew no bounds. Political considerations, too, doubtless had their weigded youth. As to the first objection, we feel sure that we are not mistaken, and even did we distrust our own judgment, we would be confirmed by Sharkey, Boyd, Williamson, Guion, Quitman, to say nothing of the commendations of Clay, Webster and Calhoun, the immortal three, whose opinions as to Prentiss' talents would be considered extravagant if they did not carry with them the imprimatur of their own great names. But we confess to the danger implied in the second suggestion. With all our ad<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
d a definite line of politics and settled for himself the question whether he would assume the role of demagogue or plant himself upon the high plane of statesmanship. He was fortunate too in the place of his birth. Abbeville county, South Carolina, was the home of his nativity and the place of his childhood. It was and is a county prolific of great men. She can rightly claim as her children, either by birth or adoption, John C. Calhoun, George McDuffie, Judge Cheves, Dr. Geddings, Judge James Calhoun, George and Aleck Bowie, Dr. John T. Pressly, the two Wardlaws, and many others whom I might mention. Genius thrives best when it finds kindred spirits around it. If I wanted an illustration of this fact, I would cite Boston with its long list of eminent men. Mr. Petigru received his primary and academic education in his native county, at the school of the celebrated teacher, Rev. Dr. Moses Waddell. He was as fortunate in having such a teacher as Dr. Waddell to start him off as he w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
The great men of this country certainly were nearly all of them country bred. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Calhoun, Patrick Henry, John Marshall, George Mason, John Randolph, Henry Clay, Henry A. Wise, Abel P. Upshur, William C. Rives,sts of Europe, whose works have built up the doctrine of free exchange of products, upheld in this country by Jefferson, Calhoun, Silas Wright, and numbers of our greatest thinkers and patriots, and held abroad by Peel, Cobden, Bright, Bastiat and Gh England over the Oregon boundary was also settled at this Congress by the wise and patriotic statesmanship of Webster, Calhoun and Benton. In this patriotic work Mr. Hunter co-operated. But it required no common nerve and sagacity for a public mcted with or led men of both parties. This sketch is but a passing glance at a long, laborious and brilliant career. Mr. Calhoun, Mr. Clay and Mr. Webster all left the Senate, or died in the Senate, about 1851 or 1852. When this grand triumvirate
The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1864., [Electronic resource], The reception of the Yankees at Atlanta. (search)
ining citizens at Atlanta seem to have been much exaggerated. The Register says: "A letter in the Atlanta Intelligencer, over the signature of 'Cantin,' is going the rounds of the papers, giving a grossly exaggerated account of the reception of the Yankees by the citizens who remained there. This letter, we are assured by Mr. Jones, does great injustice to Mayor Calhoun, whose patriotism cannot be doubted. The Mayor remained in Atlanta, after sending away his family and household effects, at the urgent request of the citizens, to make the best terms he could for the poor who were unable to remove. Mayor Calhoun has two sons in our army, one of whom--Captain W. L. Calhoun--was severely wounded on the retreat from Dalton. The other — James Calhoun — has been a private in the ranks, gallantly serving his country without thought or expectation of any reward other than the consciousness of doing his duty. The letter, we presume, is equally unjust in its reference to others.
y, made to constitute the Committees of Safety for the respective counties of the Commonwealth, in accordance with the joint resolution of the General Assembly, adopted February 25, 1865; and they are earnestly invoked to organize forthwith for the faithful and zealous discharge of their patriotic duties: Amkerst.--Paulus Powell, John Dudley Davis and Jacob Warwick. Amelia.--E. C. Robinson, William Old, jr., and S. R. Seay. Appomattox.--James G. Patterson, Samuel J. Walker and James Calhoun. Alleghany.--Andrew Fudge and William H. McDANIEL. Barbour.--Albert G. Reger, L. D. Monel and Henry R. Sturin. Bath.--Stephen A. Porter, William H. McDonald and Osborn Hamilton. Bedford.--Edward C. Burkes, William L. Goggin and Thomas Campbell. Bland.--William M. Bishop, Gordon C. Thom and Franklin Grayson. Botelourt.--James M. Figgatt, Isaac Hinkle and Captain John J. Allen. Brunswick.--Thomas Flournoy, Dr. E. B. Jones and George Harrison. Buchanan.--James H. Fuller
ulterior purpose went much farther. On the 12th of December, 1831, Mr. J. Q. Adams presented fifteen petitions, from numerous inhabitants of Pennsylvania, for the abolition of slavery in the District and of the slave trade therein. The petition was referred to a committee, which asked to be discharged from its consideration. Several petitions for the same object from citizens of Ohio were presented to the Senate by Mr. Morris, of that State, January 7, 1836. An animated debate ensued. Mr. Calhoun and Mr. Buchanan opposed the reception of the petitions on the ground that they slandered one-half the Union, and because they aimed at a violation of the Constitution. Mr. Buchanan said: "If any one principle of constitutional law can, at this day, be considered as settled, it is that Congress had no right, no power, over the question of slavery in those States where it exists. The property of the master in his slave existed in full force before the Federal Constitution was adopt