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umber of people still here; of those who are here, we are satisfied a respectable number, if allowed to remain at home, could subsist for several months without assistance, and a respectable number for a much longer time, and who might not need assistance at any time. In conclusion, we most earnestly and solemnly petition you to reconsider this order, or modify it, and suffer this unfortunate people to remain at home, and enjoy what little means they have. Respectfully submitted, James M. Calhoun, Mayor. E. E. Rawson, Councilman. S. C. Wells, Councilman. I shall now cite a few authorities upon the rights of war, to ascertain in how far the course pursued toward the inhabitants of Atlanta is in accordance with those laws which are now universally recognized. Halleck, Vattel, and Grotius establish the following rules: Grotius, B. III, chap. 12, sec. 8. (The italics are the author's.) * * * It is a just remark made bysome theologians, that all Christian princes an
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
as immediately appointed by the Governor of the State to succeed Corwin in the Senate. These changes made it necessary for Mr. Ewing to discontinue house-keeping, and Mr. Corwin took his house and furniture off his hands. I escorted the family out to their home in Lancaster, Ohio; but, before this had occurred, some most interesting debates took place in the Senate, which I regularly attended, and heard Clay, Benton, Foote, King of Alabama, Dayton, and the many real orators of that day. Mr. Calhoun was in his seat, but he was evidently approaching his end, for he was pale and feeble in the extreme. I heard Mr. Webster's last speech on the floor of the Senate, under circumstances that warrant a description. It was publicly Known that he was to leave the Senate, and enter the new cabinet of Mr. Fillmore, as his Secretary of State, and that prior to leaving he was to make a great speech on the Omnibus bill. Resolved to hear it, I went up to the Capitol on the day named, an hour or s
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
tance at any time. In conclusion, we most earnestly and solemnly petition you to reconsider this order, or modify it, and suffer this unfortunate people to remain at home, and enjoy what little means they have. Respectfully submitted: James M. Calhoun, Mayor. E. E. Rawson, Councilman. S. C. Wells, Councilman. headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Atlanta, Georgia, September 12, 1864. James M. Calhoun, Mayor, E. E. Rawson and S. C. Wells, representing City CJames M. Calhoun, Mayor, E. E. Rawson and S. C. Wells, representing City Council of Atlanta. gentlemen: I have your letter of the 11th, in the nature of a petition to revoke my orders removing all the inhabitants from Atlanta. I have read it carefully, and give full credit to your statements of the distress that will be occasioned, and yet shall not revoke my orders, because they were not designed to meet the humanities of the case, but to prepare for the future struggles in which millions of good people outside of Atlanta have a deep interest. We must have peac
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 7. engagement on four-mile Creek, Va. (search)
about seven o'clock A. M., on the thirty-first ultimo, the enemy opened fire on the United States steamer Hunchback, Lieutenant Fyffe commanding, with a battery of five guns, located on Four-Mile Creek, about two thousand yards from the river. Lieutenant Fyffe immediately returned the fire, and kept it up for some time, when the battery was apparently silenced. During the engagement the Hunchback was struck once in port wheel-house, but no damage done. About noon the monitor Saugus, Commander Calhoun, came down and took position and opened fire. The battery fired only two or three shots at the Saugus, but opened rapidly and spitefully whenever any wooden vessels showed in front. A number of vessels were fired on in this manner in the course of the day, notwithstanding the presence of the Saugus, but only one was struck — an army tug, of which the chief engineer was severely wounded. On the morning of the first instant, in company with the Agawam, this vessel took position to bri
tragglers, was in or around Resacca. McPherson immediately started in pursuit. Ere this, his advance must have reached Calhoun; and while I am warned that the sixteenth of May has passed away, and the seventeenth is about to dawn, I see the Army o the fight was not a serious one. On Tuesday the centre column, which the rebels chiefly pursued, came up to and passed Calhoun, a quiet country town of about four hundred inhabitants, which possesses many attractions for a country residence. The nds completely around the valley, McPherson's right resting on the river near its junction with the Oothkalaga Creek, or Calhoun, while the left strikes the river north of Tilton, near the junction of the river with Swamp Creek, that takes its rise g there was sharp firing on our right, but I have not learned what it was caused from. Our present position is around Calhoun, but the chances are that we will continue our retreat to Adairsville to-morrow. We may fight here, but I do not think
issance, entered the enemy's works, encountering in the suburbs Mayor Calhoun, of Atlanta, and a deputation of the City Council. The former for informality, and directed that another should be drawn up. Mayor Calhoun invited several of General Ward's staff to accompany him to thecity, I ask protection to non-combatants and private property. Jas. M. Calhoun, Mayor of Atlanta. Attest — H. W. Scott, Captain and A. A. be laid across the Oostanaula at Lay's ferry, in the direction of Calhoun; a division of the Sixteenth corps, commanded by General Sweeny, t operations to our rear, further than that he broke the road about Calhoun and then made his appearance at Dalton, where Colonel Laibold heldenjoy what little means they have. Respectfully submitted, James M. Calhoun, Mayor. E. E. Rawson, L. C. Wells. Councilmen, General Mississippi, in the field, Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. James M. Calhoun, Mayor. E. E. Rawson, and L. C. Wells, representing the City
monitors-riding out heavy gales on an open coast without murmuring or complaining of the want of comfort, which must have been very serious. They have shown a degree of fortitude and perseverance seldom witnessed. Equally brave in battle, they take the closest work with pleasure, and the effect of their shells is terrific. The following are the names of the commanders, and I hope I shall ever keep them under my command: Commander E. G. Parrott, commanding Monadnock; Commander E . . Calhoun, commanding Saugus; Lieutenant George E. Belknap, commanding Canonicus; Lieutenant Commander E. E. Potter, commanding Mahopac. There are about one thousand men left on shore by the army, who have not been got off yet, on account of the surf on the beach. These will be got off in the morning, and the soldiers will then be sent home. I enclose general order for the attack. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secret
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
nds, and of all staple articles, such as cotton and tobacco. The chief engineer was to reconnoiter the city and suburbs for a more contracted line of defense, and designate such buildings as should be destroyed to make room for his operations. The remaining buildings would be set apart for different military uses, and under the direction of the quartermaster the troops were to be permitted to pull down buildings and use the materials for constructing shanties and bivouacs. The mayor, James M. Calhoun, was compelled to issue the following proclamation, September 8th: To the Citizens of Atlanta: General Sherman instructs me to say to you that you must all leave Atlanta; that as many of you as want to go North can do so, and that as many as want to go South can do so, and that all can take with them their movable property, servants included, if they want to go, but that no force is to be used; and that he will furnish transportation for persons and property as far as Rough and Rea
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1862., [Electronic resource], Vice-President Stephens on Martial law. (search)
Vice-President Stephens on Martial law. Gen. Bragg recently declared martial law in Atlanta, Ga, and appointed Hon. James M. Calhoun Military Governor of the city; but Mr. Calhoun, doubtful of his powers sought the counsel of Hon. B. H. Hill and Vice-Pres't Stephens on the subject The latter's reply we find in the Southern Confederacy: Hon, James. M. Calhoun, Atlanta, Ga.: Richmond, Va., Sept. 8, 1862. Dear Sir: Your letter of the 28th ult, to Hon, B. H. H. Hill, was submitteMr. Calhoun, doubtful of his powers sought the counsel of Hon. B. H. Hill and Vice-Pres't Stephens on the subject The latter's reply we find in the Southern Confederacy: Hon, James. M. Calhoun, Atlanta, Ga.: Richmond, Va., Sept. 8, 1862. Dear Sir: Your letter of the 28th ult, to Hon, B. H. H. Hill, was submitted to me by him a few days ago for my views as to the proper answer to he made to your several inquiries touching your powers and duties in the office of Civil Governor of Atlanta, to which you have been appointed by Gen Bragg. I took the letter with the promise to write to you fully upon the whole subject. This, there fore, is the object of my now writing to you. I regret the delay that has occurred in the fulfilment of my promise, it has been occasioned by the press of other engagements, and
On Thursday morning last the Southern Female College of Lagrauge, Ga., was burnt, with all the edifices connected with it. It had been used for some time as a hospital. All the bedding, furniture, and things of value were saved. One hundred and thirty bales of Government cotton were burned in Savannah on Monday morning. Estimated loss, $40,000. The death of Captain Joseph Bryan, a well-known citizen of Savannah, is announced in the papers of that city. At the late municipal election in Atlanta James M. Calhoun was re-elected Mayor.
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