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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 115 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 94 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 64 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 34 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 28 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 24 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
nst her. For myself, I would not exact now more than I would have taken before the commencement of hostilities, as I should wish nothing but what was just, and that I would have sooner or later. I can readily see that the terms said to be offered on the part of Mexico may not prove satisfactory to a large part of our country, who would think it right to exact everything that power and might could require. Some would sacrifice everything under the hope that the proposition of Messrs. Clay, Calhoun, etc., would be acted upon, and save what they term the national honor. Believing that peace would be for the advantage of both countries, I hope that some terms, just to one and not dishonorable to the other, may be agreed on, and that speedily. And again, five days later: If any early session of the Mexican Congress can be obtained, I have still hopes that the treaty will be ratified, though I think the speeches and resolutions of some of our leading men, and probably by this time som
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
of, iog. Buford, General, John, at Gettysburg, 270, 271. Bull Run, the battle of, 109. Burnside, General Ambrose E., mentioned, 47, 48, , 175, 177, 180, 182, 205, 215; commands army, character, 222; mentioned, 224, 225, 226, 228, 229, 238, 239, 240; his corps at Petersburg, 355. Burnt House Fields, 4. Bustamente, General, mentioned, 32. Butler, General Benjamin F., mentioned, 110, 323, 340; bottled up, 341. Butterfield, General, Daniel, mentioned, 226, 241, 302. Calhoun, John C., mentioned, 43. Cameron, Simon, mentioned, 88, 103. Campbell Court House, 387. Camp Cooper, Texas, 59, 61, 66, 68, 69. Carnot, quotation from, 49. Carrick's Ford, 15. Carroll, Governor, of Maryland, 300. Carter, Anne Hill, 16. Carter, Charles Hill, 16. Casey, General, Silas, 167. Catumseh, a chief, 73. Cavalry contest at Gettysburg, 298. Cavalry raids, 266. Cemetery Heights, 292. Cemetery Hill, 273. Cemetery Ridge, 289-296. Cerro Gordo, battle of, 38, 40.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 5: out on picket. (search)
n old acquaintance of mine in Massachusetts and in Kansas at first refused to negotiate through me or my officers,--a refusal which was kept up, greatly to the enemy's inconvenience, until our men finally captured some of the opposing pickets, and their friends had to waive all scruples in order to send them supplies. After this there was no trouble, and I think that the first Rebel officer in South Carolina who officially met any officer of colored troops under a flag of truce was Captain John C. Calhoun. In Florida we had been so recognized long before; but that was when they wished to frighten us out of Jacksonville. Such was our life on picket at Port Royal,--a thing whose memory is now fast melting into such stuff as dreams are made of. We stayed there more than two months at that time; the first attack on Charleston exploded with one puff, and had its end; General Hunter was ordered North, and the busy Gilmore reigned in his stead; and in June, when the blackberries were a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
. Beecher, II. W., Rev., 256. Bell, Louis, Col., 236. Bennett, W. T., Gen., 265, 269. Bezzard, James, 83. Bigelow, L. F., Lt., 2. Billings, L., Lt.-Col., 269. Bingham, J. M., Lt., 176, 270. Brannan, J. M., Gen., 98. Brisbane, W. H., 40. Bronson, William, Sergt., 273. Brown, A. B., Lt., 272. Brown, John, 4, 22, 41, 60. Brown, John (colored), 274. Brown, York, 275. Bryant, J. E., Capt., 230, 231. Budd, Lt., 68. Burnside, A. E., Gen., 33,34. Butler, B. F., Gen., 1. Calhoun, J. C., Capt., 151, Chamberlin, G. B., Lt., 185, 270. Chamberlin, Mrs., 242. Cheever, G. B., Rev., 293. Child, A., Lt. 271, 272. Clark, Capt., 70, 76, 92. Clifton, Capt., 90, 91. Clinton, J. B., Lt., 170. Corwin, B. R., Maj., 115, 122. Crandall, W. B., Surg., 269. Crum, Simon, Corp., 266. Cushman, James, 256. Danilson, W. H., Maj., 80, 270. Davis, C. I, Lt., 271. Davis,.R. M., Lt., 272. Davis, W. W. H., Gen., 168. Dewhurst, G. W., Adj't., 270. Dewhurst, Mrs., 242. Dolly, Geor
r composition, it was to make short sentences and a compact style. Illustrative of this it might be well to state that he was a great admirer of the style of John C. Calhoun. I remember reading to him one of Mr. Calhoun's speeches in reply to Mr. Clay in the Senate, in which Mr. Clay had quoted, precedent. Mr. Calhoun replied (IMr. Calhoun's speeches in reply to Mr. Clay in the Senate, in which Mr. Clay had quoted, precedent. Mr. Calhoun replied (I quote from memory) that to legislate upon precedent is but to make the error of yesterday the law of today. Lincoln thought that was a great truth and grandly uttered. Unlike all other men, there was entire harmony between his public and private life. He must believe he was right, and that he had truth and justice with him, Mr. Calhoun replied (I quote from memory) that to legislate upon precedent is but to make the error of yesterday the law of today. Lincoln thought that was a great truth and grandly uttered. Unlike all other men, there was entire harmony between his public and private life. He must believe he was right, and that he had truth and justice with him, or he was a weak man; but no man could be stronger if he thought he was right. His familiar conversations were like his speeches and letters in this: that while no set speech of his (save the Gettysburg address) will be considered as entirely artistic and complete, yet, when the gems of American literature come to be selected,
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
States, which would endanger the peace between them and the republic of Mexico. Annexation of Texas became the supreme question of the canvass of 1844. James K. Polk was the nominee of the Democratic and annexation party, and Henry Clay was on the other side as the Whig nominee. Polk was elected, and his party prepared to signalize its triumph by annexation as soon as it came into power; but in the last days of President Tyler's administration, through skilful management of Secretary of State John C. Calhoun, joint resolutions of annexation were passed by both houses of Congress, subject to concurrence of the Congress of the new republic. Strange as it may seem, the resolutions that added to the territory of the United States more than the New England and Middle States combined, and which eventually led to extension to the Pacific coast and hundreds of miles north, only passed the lower house by twenty-two majority, and the Senate by a majority of two. When the resolution was
rib was never locked, and from this the negroes fed their chickens and sold them to us at the market price; shelled as much as would do them for a week, and ground their own and the supply of meal for the white family on Saturday afternoon. Around their houses they each had a few peach-trees, their chicken-houses, and near by, a sweet potato patch, for their exclusive use. At the death of one of the negroes his or her family had a regular tariff, which was enforced after the manner of Mr. Calhoun's sliding-scale of duties. A large quantity of flour, several pounds of sugar, the same quantity of coffee, a ham, a shote, and half a dozen or a dozen bottles of claret constituted the supper on which they felt they could be wakeful and watch the corpse; for a baby it was less; for a bride more, with a wedding-dress added thereto, and these requests were never denied them. The cerements were always furnished by us in case of a death. In case of illness, if chicken-soup was needed we b
as the choice of the majority. A motion was made to instruct the delegates to support Mr. Van Buren in the Convention as long as there was any reasonable prospect of his selection. Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principles in a speech of such force and eloquence that he was unanimously chosen an elector. As this was the only occasion on which I was ever a candida Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principles in a speech of such force and eloquence that he was unanimously chosen an elector. As this was the only occasion on which I was ever a candidate for the legislature of Mississippi, it may be seen how unfounded was the allegation that attributed to me any part in the legislative enactment known as the Act of repudiation.
Chapter 20: visit of Calhoun, 1845. Mr. John C. Calhoun had always been such a strict constructding a commercial convention in Cincinnati, Mr. Calhoun had in some measure changed his views, and ted to welcome him. Mr. Davis had known Mr. Calhoun with some degree of intimacy since 1836, anhe afternoon of the night that was to bring Mr. Calhoun to us. A numerous company of elegant peoplee door opened, and the committee, escorting Mr. Calhoun, entered. My Whig proclivities had inclith whom I could feel no sympathy; but when Mr. Calhoun, with head erect, cast his eagle eyes over that no dignity could be more supreme that Mr. Calhoun's. His voice was not musical; it was the danger of our country; a short review of Mr. Calhoun's career as Secretary of War, Senator, and the right to do it with all his might. Mr. Calhoun made no appeals to any emotion. The duty oina, formed in the same physical mould with Mr. Calhoun, but bearing aloft a cavalier's head, and w[4 more...]
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 21: Mr. Davis's first session in Congress. (search)
ther members, We shall hear more of that young man, I fancy. While these amenities were at their height, Mr. Giddings showed a full set of gleaming teeth, and evidently enjoyed the little impromptu debate, not caring which got the worst of it. He seemed to think the slave-holders were given over to each other, and was willing to let them alone. On March II, 1846, Mr. Polk sent a message in which he declared a state of war already existing. Mr. Davis, in the House, simultaneously with Mr. Calhoun, in the Senate, neither knowing the other had made the point, announced that while the President could declare a state of hostilities the right to declare war rested alone with Congress, the agent of the States. The rate at which Federal power has encroached can be somewhat marked by this incident, which occurred in Congress at the time the first hostilities began in Mexico. Finally the war, long threatened, had been in due form declared between the United States and Mexico. As the
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