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The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
t and admiration of the Confederate soldiers. The officers, under General Beauregard, of the batteries surrounding Fort Sumter were: Sullivan's Island, Brigadier-General R. G. M. Dunovant commanding, Lieutenant-Colonel Roswell S. Ripley, commanding the artillery: Five-gun Battery (east of Fort Moultrie), Captain S. Y. Tupper; Maffit Channel Battery (2 guns) and Mortar Battery No. 2 (2 10-inch mortars), Captain William Butler, Lieutenant J. A. Huguenin; Fort Moultrie (30 guns), Captain W. R. Calhoun: consisting of Channel Battery, Lieutenants Thomas M. Wagner, Preston, and Sitgreaves, Sumter Battery, Lieutenants Alfred Rhett and John Mitchell, and Oblique Battery, Lieutenant C. W. Parker; Mortar Battery No. 1 (2 10-inch mortars) and Enfilade Battery (4 guns), Captain James H. Hallonquist, Lieutenants Flemming, Jacob Valentine, and B. S. Burnet; the Point Battery (1 9-inch Dahlgren) and the Floating Iron-clad Battery (2 42-pounders and 2 32-pounders), Captain John R. Hamilton and
er's Department greatly; recommend Thomas Clark, W. R. Bennett, J. W. Crocker, and Addison Piles, as Assistant Quartermasters. G. T. Beauregard. Corinth, Miss., March 28th, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adj. and Insp. Genl., Richmond, Va.: Where are Generals Hawes and Brown, Colonel R. B. Lee, and Captain Wampler? All greatly wanted. Spare me General Lawton with one brigade from Georgia, if possible, for here a great battle is certain. I greatly want a general of artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel W. R. Calhoun very competent. G. T. Beauregard. Appendix to Chapter XX. Extracts from Lieutenant A. R. Chisolm's Report of the battle of Shiloh. Headquarters army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 14th, 1862. General,—In accordance with your order, I have the honor to submit the following report of orders conveyed by me on the 6th and 7th instants, during the battle of Shiloh; also a few of my observations during those two days. A few minutes before 5 o'clock, on t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
lan King, Jr., and Privates J. S. and Robert Murdock, pointing the mortars; a detachment of Marion artillery manning the battery, assisted by a detachment of the Sumter Guards, Capt. John Russell. On Sullivan's island: (1) Fort Moultrie—Capt. W. R. Calhoun, Lieutenants Wagner, Rhett, Preston, Sitgreaves, Mitchell, Parker, Blake (acting engineer). (2) mortars—Capt. William Butler and Lieutenants Huguenin, Mowry, Blocker, Billings and Rice. (3) Mortars-Lieutenants Flemming and Blanding. (4) the next generation, was this call of the State an imperative summons. The fathers and mothers who had reared them; the society whose traditions gave both refinement and assurance to their young ambition; the colleges in which the creed of Mr. Calhoun was the text-book of their studies; the friends with whom they planned their future; the very land they loved, dear to them as thoughtless boys, dearer to them as thoughtful men, were all impersonate, living, speaking, commanding in the Stat
--The late fatal duel at Charleston, S. C., resulting in the death of Col. W. R. Calhoun, of the 1st Reg't S. C. Artillery, at the hands of Maj. Alfred Rhett, of ot, which he preferred, and shot the "rise." He was dressed in full uniform; Col. Calhoun in citizen's dress. Both fired almost simultaneously, Major Rhett in an instant after Col. Calhoun. The latter missed, and fell with a ball through the middle of his body. He survived only about an hour. The quarrel which led to this ediate cause of meeting was a recent duel between Maj. Rhett and a friend of Col. Calhoun, who, though aware of the existing difficulty, had enlogized Col. Calhoun inCol. Calhoun in the presence of Maj. Rhett. Therefore, Maj. Rhett repeated his previous denunciation of Col. Calhoun, which the friend of the latter resented as an insult to himselCol. Calhoun, which the friend of the latter resented as an insult to himself, and demanded satisfaction. In this first duel Maj. Rhett received two fires of his adversary; be himself flying his second shot in the air. Here the meeting ended