Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Calhoun or search for Calhoun in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ourse of an eventful life and extensive travel, I have come in contact with many of the historic personages of the day; and yet, I scruple not to say, that of them all, but three, to my thinking, would stand the test of the most rigid scrutiny. Of these, by a singular coincidence the Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel of a cavalry regiment in the United States army—afterward respectively the ranking officers of a hostile army—Albert Sidney Johnston and Robert E. Lee were two. The third was Mr. Calhoun. No time-serving or self-seeking entered into their calculations. Self-abnegation, at the bidding of duty, was the rule of their lives. Could our much-maligned section lay no further claim to the consideration of mankind, the fact that it produced, almost in the same generation, such a triumvirate, typical of their people, is enough to place it among the foremost nations of the earth in the realm of thought, patriotism and knightly grace. By the treaty of 1848 the Territory of Utah
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
ourse of an eventful life and extensive travel, I have come in contact with many of the historic personages of the day; and yet, I scruple not to say, that of them all, but three, to my thinking, would stand the test of the most rigid scrutiny. Of these, by a singular coincidence the Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel of a cavalry regiment in the United States army—afterward respectively the ranking officers of a hostile army—Albert Sidney Johnston and Robert E. Lee were two. The third was Mr. Calhoun. No time-serving or self-seeking entered into their calculations. Self-abnegation, at the bidding of duty, was the rule of their lives. Could our much-maligned section lay no further claim to the consideration of mankind, the fact that it produced, almost in the same generation, such a triumvirate, typical of their people, is enough to place it among the foremost nations of the earth in the realm of thought, patriotism and knightly grace. By the treaty of 1848 the Territory of Utah